Microwaves.

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I have just been cleaning my microwave and noticed that its getting quite rusty. The rust is both in the corners ( been there a while) and now on the door but its not in holes anywhere.
Is there a point at which a microwave becomes unsafe because of this? Or can I use it until it blows up?
The microwave is about 20/21 years old. It still functions (as in heats, defrosts etc) and doesn't appear have any problems.
Anyone know if I should have a new one on my Christmas wish list whilst my Fairy Godmother is with me at the moment?
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A rusty microwave should fail a PAT test, if the tester has a clue what they're doing (which is extremely rare).
--
Andrew Gabriel

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On 12 Nov 2003 16:26:53 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Why ? (specifically)
I'd use a 20 year old microwave, but I'd leakage test it first.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Second that, in fact the microwave leakage standards in this country are quite lax. In fact at that age I'd dump it and get a new one!....
--
Tony Sayer


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Risk of leaking microwaves.

PAT doesn't require actually testing for microwave leakage, but requires checking for likely leakage routes like rust, dropped/bent or otherwise damaged casing, missing screws, faulty door seals or hinges, faulty door catch microwave lockout.
I think a microwave leakage test is expected to be performed following any repair/servicing on a microwave.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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getting quite

now on the

this?
heats,
whilst my

I would think that although it seems to work ok at that age there is a high risk of it leaking microwaves.............you would need to test it to be sure and even if it does leak just don't stand anywhere near it while it is working!
It has had a good life methinks, maybe it is time to retire it. You will be amazed how much more powerful new microwaves are, and it will probably cost you less than you paid for your first one even though it's 20 years on!
Angela
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This is a domestic appliance and I dont have anything tested I dont spend money willy nilly! So no PAT test. Besides what does that say really?

I dont believe in wasting money. I "retired" my 20 year old freezer recently because it wasnt working ( stopped altogether) and the council told me I had not right to do so! They said I was polluting the environment because that one now needed to be disposed of. Whilst it was true I was ( CFC's were used twenty five years ago), they made me feel as if I was simply discarding it to get a newer model because I fancied a new one!
So suggesting I should retire an item that works is quite a frightening prospect in the light of the councils view of waste not want not, make and mend and not filling up land fill or amenity tips with my discards unless I can truely justify it!
Following that experience I am quite afraid to retire anything until its well and truely "dead" ( ie blows up and smoke comes out!)
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You are quite right about the comparative cost. I recall my microwave was state of the art when I got it and cost about 150 quid. Now a similar spec would cost about 40 in the local supermarket.

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On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 17:36:10 -0000, mich wrote:

We aren't talking about a PAT test but a microwave leakage test. That is, is the 500+W of RF energy staying inside the metal box or getting out to cook anything within range?
As yours is showing signs of rust in the corners it might be starting to leak. What condition is the door seal in? Thats generally the weakest part.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
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I havent had one of those either. Bottom line , nothing in my house is tested. It either works , in which case its part of the furniture , or it doesnt, in which case it goes out.

The door seal is actually very good. In fact its in generally good condition because I have looked after it. ( I am one of those horrible people who also always looked after my toys as a kid and still has them in the boxes looking almost pristine!)
I was messing with the rust last night and on closer examination it doesnt seem to be particularly deep. Just a bit pitted I am thinking of doing as another poster has suggested and clean it up and then see.
I simply dont like the idea of throwing something out because its got old.
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Any chance that you have been *too* enthusiastic about keeping the microwave pristine?
I have a suspicion that some of the kitchen cleaners sold these days are a little too aggressive and their residues may cause damage, including rust. This was after an incident we had where our kitchen radiator suddenly went rusty (and leaked) all along the bottom seam. I think it was due to the particular floor cleaner that we were using at the time, being accidentally sloshed up onto the radiator..... first stripping the paint and then attacking the bare steel.
--
Tony Williams. Change "nospam" to "ledelec" to email.

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wrote:

I havent really used a lot of kitchen cleaners on it. I have a habit of sticking to simple things like soapy water . I did have a ceramic hob and microwave cleaner several years ago but dodnt like it and ( oops) its still in the kitchen cupboard nearly full! The rust if anything is a result of years of dampness in the box ( from steam off the food as it cooked or from water I put in there to boil and loosen the dirt particles( done as per the original manual)
But I agree in general with your comment about cleaners.
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mich wrote:

I assume you leave the door open a little once you've finished with it? That should help reduce the dampness hanging around too long.
Velvet
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mich wrote:

Sounds like your brain might be microwaved!
Don't suppose you happen to have a leaky microwave in your house.....?
Fairly simple test, if you have a Tmobile or Orange phone, or a "3" phone (Vodafone/Cellnet are too low-frequency to be a reasonably fair test).
Call your mobile from your house phone. Answer call. Put mobile in microwave. Close door. DO NOT TURN ON MICROWAVE. See if your mobile can hold the call. If it can, then its RF energy is getting out of the microwave, and it is only a 1 watt transmitter.
So what are those 500 Watts or more of microwave energy from the oven doing to you when you use it?
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Oh so everyone here (except me) has all their electrical appliances tested for safety by a certificated electrical installeer every year do they?
What a goody two shoes bunch you all are ( and got lots of dosh too - no doubt as a result of all the cash you save doing it yourselves in other areas <g>)

I have cellnet , sorry.
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mich wrote:

No, it was an attempt at humour!
And there's no such word as certificated!

Well you could try it anyway....
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[26 lines snipped]

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q rtificated
3 entries found for certificated. certificate ( P ) Pronunciation Key (sr-tf-kt) n.
1. A document testifying to the truth of something: a certificate of birth. 2. A document issued to a person completing a course of study not leading to a diploma. 3. A document certifying that a person may officially practice in certain professions. 4. A document certifying ownership.
tr.v. certificated, certificating, certificates (-kt)
To furnish with, testify to, or authorize by a certificate.
[Middle English certificat, from Old French, from Medieval Latin certifictum, something certified, from neuter of Late Latin certifictus, past participle of certificre, to certify. See certify.]
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
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Huge wrote:

I am correctificated (I thought certificated was a bush-ism)
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Well , if you would rather be certified, with the implied loss of mental faculties thats OK by me! The word certificated does exist btw. - transatlantic import.
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Some people do, yes.
It's a condition of residence in the home where my father lives that everything is PAT tested. It's only 3.50 per item with a 35 minimum call-out fee (+VAT).
Andrew
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