Fitting aerial on roof - how to get up there!

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too
That is a Mansard roof, named for a French Renaissance architect (whose name was actually Mansart). I would not consider it unusual, although it is probably more widely used in continental Europe.
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Personally, I always get aerials fitted by a professional. It is relatively inexpensive and, as I always seem to live in a marginal area, it avoids me having to spend ages on a roof, trying to get the best signal strength.
If you do want to DIY, you need a ladder that will run up to the ridge at the join of the two roof slopes and a roof ladder to take you from there to the top ridge. I have always fitted a row of strong eye bolts, about every four feet or so, under my gutters. I use a rope to a couple of those to secure the top of any ladder I am going to use to access the roof from. You should also lash the access ladder to the roof ladder, when you have it in position. Stepping over the top of the access ladder onto the roof ladder is always the fun bit.
Colin Bignell
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nightjar wrote:

I thiught it was a Dutch Gable actually.

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name
A Dutch gable is a flat wall with curved sides that forms the end of a piece of roof.
To be pedantic, a Mansard roof should have four sides, but the term has been adopted for any double pitched roof. It is also known as a Second Empire roof, from its wide use in France during that period.
Colin Bignell
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On Thu, 24 Jul 2003 09:04:47 +0100, <nightjar> wrote:

I've never done it, but I always imagined that the coming back down is even worse. At least going up, you can see what you're doing.
--
John

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even
In my experience, by the time I am ready to come down, I have become accustomed to working at height and it is no great deal.
Colin Bignell
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Safety wise, it's one of these things that if you have to ask, you'd be better getting a pro in.
--
*Ah, I see the f**k-up fairy has visited us again

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Really suggest that you get a rigger in for this one and a CAI member that knows what he's doing and check he's insured. Those tiles look like a disaster area to me. They'll be a roofing ladder required and something to take or spread the load under that where it meets the extension ladder up from the ground. Also you'll need someone who is used to what he's doing not to break and tiles whilst lashing the chimney.
Just get a pro in for this one. I used to do this work years ago on a daily basis and I wouldn't fancy this one:-((..
And I know what I'm doing!..
--
Tony Sayer


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David Aldridge wrote:

Get a professional. They'll advertise in the classifieds in your local paper.
I got a firm to run an FM spur to my bedroom (I'm a Radio Four junkie) and they stung me 30ukp. Obviously your situation is more complex, needing a new aerial (replacing, presumably?), so they'll advise on specification and do the job for you.
It's not much help, but hth.
--
Ben Blaney
GSF1200 VFR800 CBR600 CD200
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THANKS FOR EVERYONES HELP!
I have decided that I'd rather be safe, so I'll pay someone to put one up - I've had a quote of 105 for the complete job including a high gain aerial for DTV and all the bits and running the cable into my lounge which seems reasonable.
Thanks Again
Dave.

too
my
sides.
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up -

It does sound so - and a wise choice, I think.
Despite my amusing memories, there can be a very serious side when inexperienced people climb ladders or fail to ensure they have the right safety equipment. My brother was painting an upstairs window when the ladder slipped. He landed on his feet but pain later forced him to go to the hospital. He'd cracked 3 vertebrae and had to spend six weeks flat on his back in hospital.
If that wasn't bad enough, there was a work to rule of hospital staff at the time. That meant his care wasn't as good as it might usually have been and every visitor had the unnerving experience of walking through a vocal, not particularly friendly, picket line - some ancillary staff seemed to think patients' visitors should be banned in support of their pay claim. That was very frightening for his small children who badly needed to visit him often for the reassurance that Daddy, who had suddenly disappeared from their world, was ok.
He recovered fully. His son, aged about three at the time and a very sensitive child, had seen the accident and the consequences, and it took him far longer to recover from the distress and the nightmares that one day Daddy wouldn't come back.
Barbara
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