Drinking water filters - when to change element?

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snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

Yes, definitely if you are in a high chalk high chlorine area. I am not sure they don't put in ion exchange resin pre-loded with sodium as well, otherwise I don't see how they get the chalk out - or teh chlorine.
Whether the small difference in taste is worth it tho, is another matter. I don't bother anymore.

I always got green slime before I got 'didn't do anything' on the Britas. They honestly lasted a year or so just filling the kettle, but every summer algal bloom got them, and so I used to drain, wash out with bleach, and refit new cartridges.

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snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote in berlin.de:

A "sighted" test in my glass teapot says filterd water produces a much paler brew, which strangely gives the same shade of brown in the cup.
There is also no sludge at the bottom.
As the filter ages the tea goes dark and muddy.
I *only* use it for tea; I think otherwise the impurities are good gor me, at leest vey've mevver bun be eddy har
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One issue is growth of bacteria in the cartridges, in the material they have filtered out. Commonly, silver in some form is used to limit this, and I believe that is the component which wears out, resulting in increased bacteria levels. Having said that, I always use my Brita cartidges for at least 3 months, 3 times longer than you're supposed to, and these have the same issue. The water softener and whatever removes the chlorine "swimming pool" smell from our tap water in them has never worn out on me, and I'm in a hard water area. My Brita filter is always kept in the fridge though, which may also help with limiting bacteria.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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It may also be the main help with the taste, rather than the filtering. Few people can detect the difference between filtered and unfiltered water after it is refrigerated, so you may not notice even if the filter has totally expired.
Christian.
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Well where I am in North Hampshire, the difference is very obvious as the tap water has so much chlorine in it that it smells like a swimming bath, and that doesn't go by standing it in the fridge to cool (done that by accident when forgetting to but a new filter in the jug on a couple of occasions, and no one could miss it). Nowhere else I've lived had so much chlorine in the water -- this is the first place I've bothered to use a water filter.
The water softner part has certainly never worn out either -- no deposits form in the kettle which is always filled from the filter, and I'm in a hard water area.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

I'm in the same area and I don't know why they have the cheek to charge for the water around here. It more like dilute limewash than water. Neighbours without water softener have had to replace HW cylinders twice in 20 years.
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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

This is what dissuaded swmbo from having a fixed tap cartridge system years ago. There was some info about germs building up in the cartridges and that idea went straight out the window...
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A water filter of the type you describe has several factors which determine its optimum life. The quality of the water going into it, the amount of water going through and the length of time. No manufacturer can accurately determine the first two without testing your water and putting a meter on the filter. If as you say your use is minimal, then it is likely that the 6 months described in the manual is more of an arse covering recommendation. That said the 3rd measure, time, should not be ignored. I would suggest you are unlikely to taste increased bacteria, and that a taste test or a flow test is thus not sufficient. I have a very large Britta water filter on my coffee machine in my cafe, and the local environmental health insist that regardless of usage, it must be changed at least annually. Personnaly I would likewise change a home filter annualy. It is better to be safe than sorry.
Richard
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