Damp garage

Not a problem as such, I'm just thinking of how I can improve things in my garage. It's a bit damp and spidery in there, and I'm concerned that using it for storage might not be a great idea come Autumn and Winter.
It has a concrete floor, brick walls, wood/felt roof and a wooden door. Is there much I can do to help prevent damp in there? Obviously it's never going to be totally dry, but I was wondering about sealing the floor and/or walls with something.
Cheers, J
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Firstly you need to determine where the moisture is coming from. Mine used to be damp, its a concrete sectional and the water came in under the walls. I fixed it with some trowelling putty stuff from B&Q after some advice in here and now it is very dry. Open to humidity in the air but that is all, no other dampness comes in.
I would give it a damn good clean, taking note of where the dirt is as this can often be an indication. then either wait for the next rain shower or get the hose out and look for where the water is coming in. Seems to me you have three main entry points, the roof, the walls or coming up through the floor. All are fixable to a degree but for advice we really need to know what the problem is.
Peter
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Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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snipped-for-privacy@MAPS.dundee.ac.uk (Peter Ashby) wrote:

How do you fix that one?
Mark W.
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snipped-for-privacy@NOcix.SPAMco.TODAYuk (Mark Webb) wrote:

I presume with an impermeable layer and a new floor on top that. Either that or demolition and rebuilding.
Peter
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Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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A DPM (damp proof membrane) which is a thick plastic sheet. This will raise the floor a considerable amount, due to extra screed, though. This might be illegal in a garage integrated into a house, which requires a dropped floor so that exhaust fumes (which sink) don't flow over into the house through the door.
Christian.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.yahooxxxx.co.uk (Christian McArdle) wrote:

Ignorance time, but how thick a screed would you need to stop the car breaking it up? Inches presumably?
Mark W.
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Jon Read wrote:

and closing the door. Tools can go rusty in no time if care is not taken.
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