Central Heating question

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That is true, and in many cases it is best to keep it running, especially when having an outside weather compensator. But switching out the burner when the house is up to temp is pretty well necessary.
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Mike Hibbert wrote:

Each TRV shuts down when its room gets warm enough.
Eventually teh heat loss from te hot water is so low, that teh boiler shuts off as return flow temps exceed 60.
Your pump will run all the time, but the boiler won't.

Not necessarily. You COULD fit a stat, but why bother? Better if teh house is decentluy insulated to run teh CH off a timer and set it to come on at susnet, and go off around midnight, and again a little before dawn.

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This is all rubbish, after 20 years in the controls businessI have concluded the only solution is a rectal thermometer worn by SWHBO with an RF link to the main heating plant. In this way the system responds to her core temperature and ignores all the other irrelevant factors.

to be

Bosch
rads
TRV's
boiler,
set
it
off,
must be

I
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"Peter" wrote | This is all rubbish, after 20 years in the controls businessI have | concluded the only solution is a rectal thermometer worn by SWHBO
she who has ...; no I'm not going there
| with an RF link to the main heating plant. In this way the system | responds to her core temperature and ignores all the other | irrelevant factors.
I would quite like an infra-red thermometer under the desk aimed at my kneecaps, as they're the bits of me that get coldest whilst sitting at the PC. And one over the bedhead aimed at my nose, as ditto whilst in bed.
Owain
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Peter wrote:

There is definitely something to be said for that approach...
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The building control inspection could be rather interesting...
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Andrew Gabriel

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writes:

concluded
to
As long as you don't make an arse of it.
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"Mike Hibbert" wrote

This is almost if not exactly the same as my setup.
There's no room stat and I control the overall temperature via the control on the boiler (which for me is in the kitchen).
I have TRV's on all the rads, including now the recently installed towel rail, however, I don't turn off any of the TRV's.
Maybe i've done wrong by TRV'ing the last radiator, but I don't know whether the lack of a room stat is an issue. I suppose it'd save visiting the boiler !
I tend to whack the TRV's on max and keep the boiler on low rather than the reverse.
Cheers,
Paul.
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The TRVs sense room temperature. They should be set at around 21C, so that the radiators turn themselves off when the room gets to temperature. Many people erroneously think that they are "power" controls rather than "temperature" controls and think the room will heat quicker on a higher setting. They are wrong. The radiator will get to the same high temperature whatever the setting, provided the room is colder than the selected temperature. I really wish TRVs were marked in Celcius, as people would understand the meaning rather than the ambiguous 1-6 thing.
The boiler control is probably the output water temperature. This will affect how hot the radiators get and will affect their output power. If you set this too low on a conventional boiler, you may get some condensing action, which may corrode the heat exchanger. However, lower settings get better thermodynamic efficiency. On a condensing boiler, the heat exchanger is designed to condense, so set it as low as is effective.

If you have TRVs on all radiators, or you have an S-plan system with room stat, you need an (preferably automatic) bypass valve on the system. Otherwise, the water circuit can be entirely blocked, which can cause problems for the boiler circulation and any pump overrun.

It is. It reduces the efficiency, causing you to waste energy by continuing to heat water that isn't required.
Christian.

the
stat.
boiler,
set
it
off,
must be

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