Any reason not to put 13A sockets upside down?

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Hi,
just looking at clearances on sockets, and space needed for cable to go down beneath the plug then bend.
Looking at it, I realised that things would be much easier if the socket was the other way up - so the cable exited up the wall.
Taking it one step further there must be instances where a socket on its side would make access easier.
So is there any major safety reason why plugs have the earth pin at the top and the live/neutral at the bottom?
TIA
Dave R
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You may have trouble with flexes going straight up being bad for strain relief. On the side isn't so bad.
Christian.
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Reminds me of a job i was on once :-)
A house was being completely refurbed and the plumbers and electrics all went in to the kitchen and did their thing ... usual scenario ........ bottom of boxes 1060mm from the floor ...... no one told them that there was plans to screed the floor 4" and then lay quarry tiles before the units went in ...... sockets ended up almost resting on the worksurface ..... the electrician decided to put the sockets in upside down because, otherwise there would have been no room for the cable, and told the client that it was a new UK regulation.
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wrote:

It wouldn't be a problem if we weren't putting a desk with a metal foot up against the wall where the socket is going.
As the cable is going directly upwards, then through a hole in the back of the desk, it seemed more practical to have the plug with the cable emerging upwards.
Turning the plug round if/when we move the desk is not a problem.
IIRC (and a quick Google didn't give an answer) sockets are supposed to be quite high up the wall to assist disabled access.
Anyone got the curent min/max height?
TIA Dave R
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Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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On 30 Oct 2003 15:13:52 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

Although remember that this is a Building Regulations and not Wiring Regulations thing and as such only applies in new buildings or construction......
.andy
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wrote:

Well spotted that man....fortunately I am exempt on this work as it is in an existing room :-)
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Andy Hall wrote:

Is it just me, or is that really stupid? I want my sockets about 2" above the skirting. Is that so much to ask?
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Grunff wrote:

You could get away with it if you really wanted, just make some very tall skirtings.
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This is not regulation, it's only guidelines to work by. New public buildings must be freely accessible by the disabled, both in its entry and exit doors and the other facilities it offers, or the builder can be fined rather a lot of money, so rather than go for a fine, the builders are following guidelines which tell them what people with disabilities need.
If it was a general regulation that all new house builds were to have wheelchair access, then they wouldn't be able to use staircases to get to houses higher up in a block of flats. So the height of sockets is still only a requirement on new builds so they can be occupied and used by a person with a disability if needed, without the need to remodel or alter it.
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Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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Question is, after you have your nice shiny new-build or material extension according to Regs, is there anything to stop you retro-fitting all the sockets back to a normal height to suit the decor/normal usage?
cheers Richard
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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wrote:

There is nothing to stop you from making two rows of sockets, one at low level and one at high level, just as long as you don't exceed the cable requirements.
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snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

Ah yes, an optimal height to trip over the wires. A great danger to the movement or visually impaired. I wonder how many grannies will fall over and break their hips as a result.
Steve
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New building regs state the height of sockets and switches in dwellings to be installed so that all persons including those whose reach is impaired can easilly use them. A way of satisfying the regs is to install them between 450 mm and 1200mm. The regs do not apply to kitchens or garages but specifically only to rooms that visitors would normally use.
This is for new builds and as far as I know, extensions can be left at the old height. It would look rather silly in an extended living room to have 4 sockets at 6 inches and 4 at 18 inches
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Mmmmm.
Number one son, in a brand new ground floor flat (Very North Sctland) has most of his sockets mounted about 6 to 8 inches from the floor. No where near the 450 to 1200mm mentioned above.
Dave
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In older properties this is the norm' but newer legislation is allowing for disability in the height requirements, making for ease of use by people in wheelchairs or who have difficulty in bending down. You're also getting older and might find that one day, you to would like to be able to plug in your tele' without having to bend over to far and aggravate your arthritis.
The younger maid used to do all these jobs in days of yore'. :-))
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BigWallop wrote:

How many appliances do you actually plug and unplug?
The black and deceker. Ok so granny camn do her won filings.
The vacum ckleaner. Mmm. If she can';t get out of teh effin wheelchair teh vacuum cleaner seems a bit strange # The iron. Ditto. Her hair curlers. Ok she camn do that in teh kitchen where the sockets are hogher can't she.
Its boloocks. 99% of sockets are either never used, or never unplugged
What is the most comkon thing after a vacuum cleaner, iron or hairdryer that nees unplugging.
Light bulbs. Shame they didn't make THOSE between 450m and 1200mm. :-)

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OK NP ..... take a deep breath before typing ..... and I won't have to break in to my mescalin cabinet next time I need to read one of your posts
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<<snipped>>

So you think people in wheelchairs don't iron their clothes or use vacuum cleaners ? My mother was wheelchair bound after an accident and still went about her normal life of ironing the clothes and vacuuming the house. We lifted all the sockets, and put new ones in, so she could reach them easier. I think after you've seen how someone in a wheelchair can be just as independent as everyone else, then you'll realise how stupid your last reply sounds.
OK, they might not find it too difficult to bend over and plug something in, but doing this all the time can cause more injury and discomfort to the person than is really necessary in everyday life. So isn't it easier to make small adjustments right at the start ? It make the things we use everyday to make it easier and more comfortable for everyone to use.
I think you might look back one day and say to yourself, boy, I could've done with lifting these sockets a bit higher up the wall when I had the chance. Everyone gets older and finds it more difficult to bend or stoop to plug the iron in the wall socket, so why not do it right at the start of the build ? That way, everyone can use them without discomfort.
When I stop and think about it, after we did the remodelling for my Mum, we all found things were easier to get at and use, so why didn't we have it like that in the beginning ? Weird. :-))
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