Re: PLUMBING ~ Fiberglass Tub Rough.pdf (1/1)

78" above rough floor is too low for shower heads. I go 80" above tub floor.
I rough shower valve at 35" above tub floor, tub spout centered about four inches above tub rim. The shower will get more use than the tub. Why make the person bend way over to work the valve? Most tub spouts you can stub out with copper. This eliminates using galvanized nipples so you can more easily center the spout 12" or so from the valve.
MM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wow this is really nice, and what a great idea. But, there are many different tub manufactures, and these measurements may, or may not work with other tub units. Thats a great idea for young plumbers,,its hard enuf to remember all this crap.
Blackbeard is another one of the plumbers that frequent here that I would love to sit down and pick at your brain for a couple hrs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
damnit mine wont d/l, anyone gets a chance send it to me, thanks Roy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
people like to use the spout as a handhold to get up out of tub. make sure you attach it very well.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've used 78" on the shower head for years. I've never had a complaint. At 6' 6" off the floor, that's a good measurement. I suppose the additional 2" is a good idea. It would accommodate those people out there who are a little taller. Yeah, I like it.
OK, I'll change it to 80"
As you know, some of these measurements are not code. I've been working on a pile of business-card sized cheat cards so some of those guys out there who don't have as much experience will have something in their wallet for quick reference.
Thanks for pointing out that I failed to mention the 4" above the tub rim and I forgot to mention to build the entire shower assembly out of copper. Pex is cheaper. But when it comes to install, that copper really makes things easy.
What I'm trying to do is get very solid measurements (especially backers) that I can give to the framers. Let the framers put in the backers. Let the framers frame behind the shower the RIGHT way instead of putting a stud dead-center of our valve. We're plumbers. We don't carry framing tools on our truck.
Two things that will make your jobs go much faster. One, let the framer frame to your specs so you don't have to fuck with backers and you don't have to fuck with moving studs (and then adding studs when moving a stud causes the framing to deviate from code). Two, have the guy digging the footings to go ahead and use his transit to dig your sewer line (and even a graded trench (based on where you tell him to dig). That way, you'll never have dig gravel or fight with the french drain or knock a hole through the foundation again. It will also save you the cost of a 2nd backhoe trip out there. Since he's digging with a transit, you'll never stand in a ditch with a shovel trying to get grade, and you'll never have a contractor freaking out on you because he wants to landscape or pour the sidewalk. In addition, when it comes time to test your water lines and sewer, all you have to do is turn the water on and fill most of the DWV right at the tub. Also, you use city water to charge the pipes (so instead of pumping air from 0-100lbs for your test, you start the test at around 70-80lbs. Not only does it save you time on pulling hoses and testing, since you are mostly charged with water, it makes it very easy to find a leak. (you ever tried to LISTEN for a leak when you have nailguns and other tradesmen). Do it my way and all you have to do is look for the drip. If you dont' see the drip, come back a little later and look for the puddle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Two things that will make your jobs go much faster.
One, let the framer frame to your specs so you don't have to fuck with backers and you don't have to fuck with moving studs
umm duh. You just now figured that out.
Two, have the

Jesus man you have some good cement jarheads over there. Here cement is the dumber group on the site. Never trust cement!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, I didn't just figure that out. But in my area, it is highly unusual for our framers to do anything but framing. They DO NOT install backers and they DO place studs dead-center where I need a tub valve, etc. I don't know why it is like that in my part of the world. But we have to get the job done. And if that means pull a stud, move a stud, hammer in additional studs, etc...that's what we do. In my area, if you can find a plumber that regularly has backers, etc. done by the framer, I'd like to meet the guy. In my area, we simply do what we need to do to get the job done. As a result, we have to deal with a lot of dumb shit that doesn't relate to our trade at all.
And if that's not a kick in the pants, in my area, most shops will do per-fixture pricing. And the average price per fixture in my area is only $450/fixture. That figure hasn't changed in 15 years. I've rattled every cage in town. These guys are so afraid of losing work to out-of-town shops that they continue to kill themselves at $450/fixture (material costs and sub costs included!!!)
I rarely touch new construction unless it's commercial or unless it's a large custom home where they're willing to pay what the job is worth and not what track-home builders tell the local plumbers they're willing to pay. I really dislike the mindset of plumbers in my area. I've heard per-fixture pricing as low as $385/fixture (costs included). At that price, may as well stay home at watch TV.
What we really need is a union around here to help protect our trade.
But no Ned, I'm not just catching on. I'm just exasperated by the way plumbers in my area allow themselves to be jerked around by our local contractors. Oh well, it is what it is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
fuck no on union. I bet it takes me 10 seconds to remove wall stud. It pays off to have a skilled person around when setting up pipes that will be burried in cement. I like to be there durring whole process.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In my area, the way everyone tops off their system for inspection (10-foot head of water) is they pull a hose from a temporary connection to the city meter. If you do it that way, you have to pull the hose pipe (garden hose) off your truck...carry it to the temporary water source, make your connection, etc. etc....then disconnect, re-load truck, etc.
If you have your water service pipe in place before you call for your rough inspection, you can use the tubs to fill up the majority of your system. You'll have to top off that 10-foot head of water with a garden hose (we have an adapter we made to fit the stub-out for the shower head). This saves a lot of time.
After you have your DWV pipes filled with water, you have also (at the same time) primed your entire water distribution system with water. It will take a few seconds to top that water distribution off to 100-lbs. pressure for your test.
So you save on pulling hoses, etc. and you save time on charging the system with air. If you install your sewer/water lines FIRST, you'll save at least 2-hours on every house. In addition, when you drain the system down, instead of flooding the yard, you just pull the pumpball and it all goes down the sewer.
If you add in the money you save (the backhoe who digs the footer can dig your sewer at the same time so you don't have to call him out for a special trip (approx. $185/trip in my area). and you add the time that a plumber would have to work in the crawl area grading that pipe, you'll discover you'll save a full day of labor plus over $400 CASH on every job. Work smarter, not harder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
as if its quicker to water test. only if I have too..sometimes on castiron jobs.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It is quicker to pre-charge you water pipes with water before you pump in the last 20-30lbs of pressure for the 100-lbs you need for your test. There is less air space to fill which means it goes a lot faster.
If you're not using water to test your DWV system, then I assume you're using smoke. If that's the standard in your area, that's faster than water testing. In my area, everyone uses water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I will sometimes water test my copper but PVC is tested with nothing but air. If there is a problem with finding leak (never happened yet) I have wished I had a smoke machine, but never used one. I like to test my water pipes at 100 psi. That is not going to happen with a well pump or most city systems. I use air because it goes to higher pressure easier and it is more likely to leak than water. It does not take longer to fill pvc with air to test than water. water takes longer, thats why we all use air.
ever use a vacum cleaner to suck pvc glue into a leak? I have done it on vents a couple of times.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.