Basement Plumbing Rough-In question


Our builder put in our plumbing rough-in and I have two questions about what is the usual and customary way to do this.
We were left with just the pipe stub sticking out of the concrete for the shower and toilet pipes The toilet pipe is 3" white plastic, PVC probably?
There is no space around it to add the toilet flange? This seems like a stupid way to leave a rough-in if we have to bust up the concrete floor to put the flange in? Is this the customary way a basement rough-in is done on new construction? Is there a way to add the toilet flange without busting the concrete or raising the toilet?
Also, I'm going to contact the builder because the distance from the toilet rough-in to the tub/shower drain is too close to meet the code of 15" clear space from the center of the toilet to the edge of a standard tub (the way the rough-in is supposed to be laid out. Finally in order to place the vent pipe inside the same wall running behind the toilet, it only leaves 11.5" of space to the back of the toilet and as I'm sure you know 12" is the required amount of space. I think we could squeeze a toilet in here, but the flange is an issue as is the distance from the shower/tub
Thank you for any advice in advance, Kim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
what kind of floor is going in there?
I personally don't leave just a stub coming out of the cement. I get a piece of 6" such and put it around my riser.
There are toilet flanges that take a pipe cut flush with the floor.
Is the center of your toilet drain 11.5 inches from finish wall or from rough wall? some toilets are better at 11.5 because the tank is designed to touch the wall.
the tub/shower unit should not really have just a stub, I box out a 1 foot square where my trap goes. this will need to be hammered up possibly.
15" is the side to side dimension for toilet. What is the measurement you got?
Most importantly. You can't be trusted to take measurements because you are not a skilled tradesperson. Don't come here trying to gain "ammo" to fire at your contractor, instead ask him/her yourself in a nice way. the tone of your questions make you sound like you are negative and trying to find fault.
You have no place saying something that something is "stupid" when you have no understanding of it at all. THAT is stupid and arrogant.
lastly, how did you end up with a wall too small to accommodate the vent? who designed the floor-plan? is there a plan for the bathroom? Did you design the layout yourself?
remember if you design something with no formal training or experience then you are likely to have problems, and they are nobody's fault but your own.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When you say "builder" I hope you meant "plumber". If not, I'd immediately demand that a licensed plumber reinstall the entire plumbing rough in.

That's no big deal. They make "inside the pipe" floor flanges. I personally prefer lead, but hey, different strokes for different folks.

Yes, there should be a minimum of 15" from each side of the toilet. The 11.5" to the rear wall is no big deal because most 12" rough toilets will set at that dimension and you can get tank type toilets with a 10" rough in. If your plumbing was done by a non-professional plumber you could have problems that would make these concerns pale in comparison. Does each fixture have it's own trap and vent? What type fittings and pipe were used? Was it tested? There are so many things that could be wrong the only practical way to ensure that a disaster is not being buried beneath the concrete and walls is to make certain you have hired a licensed and competent plumber for the project.
Bob Wheatley
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.