woodworking/millwork question

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You could try starting with Ipe flooring, comes in 1/2" and 3/4" thick, 4"-12" wide and 8'-20' lengths, pre-finished or unfinished, T&G or straight 90deg edges. Purchase an 2' long, 10" wide, 1/2" thick, unfinished, straight 90deg edge piece of Ipe flooring. Trim Ends. Route and finish edges. Commonly available and usually less expensive per board foot than Ipe boards of similar size.
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Dave Bugg wrote: ...

It's far more difficult on a ts than bs (of adequate capacity which any good shop will have). 9" resawing is beyond the reach of a 10" ts.
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dpb wrote:

Really? I haven't had a problem with it. Just flip the stock. I do it all the time. Much quicker, no issue with blade tracking.
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Dave Bugg wrote:

Powermatic Model 66 Table Saw Model: 66 specs Blade Diameter (in): 10 Arbor Diameter (in): 5/8 Max. Depth of Cut (in): 3-1/8 (in).
For a 9" piece that leaves you w/ 2" in the middle you now have to do with something else (like a bandsaw, maybe? :) ).
W/ a decent bandsaw and a resaw blade, blade drift is no issue.
Post this question on rec.woodworking and I'd bet the bandsaw would be the choice 10:1.
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dpb wrote:

of 9" for the rip. It was one of those kinda evenings.
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On 4/9/2008 1:23 AM Dave Bugg spake thus:

>

Yes, but ...
I agree with whoever said that if one were to post this on a woodworking group, the answer would be "bandsaw" 10-to-1. It's just a better tool for the job; much smaller kerf, and therefore less wood waste *and* less power required for the cut, and probably less dangerous too (remember that ipe is really hard wood). Yes, potential problems with tracking, but that's what tuning a bandsaw (and learning how to steer wood through it) is all about.
Of course, if one doesn't have a bandsaw, as I don't ... hell, you could rip from both sides on your table saw, then handsaw the remaining inch or so in the middle.
Or you could do it like Noah's carpenters, sawing the whole thing by hand ...
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On Tue, 08 Apr 2008 18:31:38 -0500, Crabshell

This can be done on a large bandsaw or one equipped with riser blocks. This kind of cut is called a "resaw." The result is book-matched pieces.
A tablesaw can rip this cut by flipping the stock, keeping the same side against the fence, then a handsaw can cut out the remaining center. With a 10" blade you'll have a 1" center to remove.
Another method is to use a surface planer. With this method much of the wood is wasted and you get just one piece.
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The operation is resawing, as most agreed here. Then you need to run it in a big ass jointer to get it flat, a planer to get it to even dimensional thickness and a final pass in the drum sander to get it smooth.
But if you have the skills of the late Dick Proenneke, all you need is a hand saw!
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