woodstove hearths

Anyone know of any sites with pictures of brick woodstove hearths. I wood like to get some ideas before I build mine. Thanks
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Start with your municipal building permits office, which will give you minimum specifications for an acceptable hearth.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Lots of useful books and pamphlets written over the years with coverage, for background info. Stuff like having adequate space for airflow behind/under whatever heat-shield you use.
Main thing is to ensure that all flammables stay below about 200 deg F.
If your stove has acceptable infrared blocking on underside, this may simplify things for you, since the bricks would not be the protection for flammables below. Pass mfg specs to building inspector and see what his safety requirements are.
Enjoy, J
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I am not interested in all that stuff, my bricklayer is doing the job and knows all of that. I would like to find design ideas, I looked on google images and did some searches but pictures of nice hearths are hard to find.

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habbi wrote:

Yep, people here like to tell you everything except what you are looking for. There are probably local resources, stove seller, brick sellers etc. that have designs that you can look at. I would check brick sellers first.
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Hearths made in the past may not meet code for your specific woodstove. Read your installation requirements. This will give you the size required. Also you will need a certain R-value if on a combustible floor like wood. I wanted a thinner hearth, so I used 2 layers of an insulating board called Micor, then wonderbaord, then ceramic tile.
My building inspector went by what my stove manufacturer required for my specific model of stove. Same with my insurance company and the inspector they sent out to OK the installation before covering me on my homeowners policy.
Micor... http://www.gypsumsolutions.com/brand.asp?brand=Micore
"habbi" wrote in message

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wrote:

I'd suggest making your hearth pad bigger than the minimum required, if possible - especially at the front. I know it might seem like it would take up too much room, but let me tell you - the first time you open the door and a log falls out, you'll be happy you have that extra protection.
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