Wood flooring a DIY project?

I am wanting to replace mt dining room carpet and my kitchen sheet linolium with harwood. I have a relative that works for Bruce so I got 3/4 inch wood flooring pretty cheap. My only question is, is this something I can do myself? it is a rather large are and I have never laid wood flooring before. I just finished the floor in our bathrooms. It was Durastone. It turned out ok but I am very slow.
How does a wood floor go together and what are your thoughts?
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It's pretty straight forward. I have laid hardwood in my living and dining room, hallway, powder room and family room. Eighteen years down and still going strong! It is time consuming but isn't everything we do that we want done right?
As far as installation goes, tongue into groove, secure to floor with a rented air nailer (specific for flooring). Of course I have oversimplified it as there are many little things to consider such as starting off and remaining square, proper expansion space, not having joints too close, picking out and using only the good boards, etc. I bought a book on laying hardwood and along with the instructions from Bruce, there wasn't much that I ran up against that I couldn't handle. It doesn't get much easier as far as DIY projects go.
However, having said that, it may pay to have someone install it. You are probably saving enough on the flooring to put it into the install. I say this because I am at the point in my life where I want certain things done ASAP so I can enjoy them. If I was going to save a $1/1.50 on the purchase, I would put that to the install. This doesn't guarantee anything of course and sometimes you can do a better job because you have more time to do it.

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On 13 Jan 2004 12:50:53 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Don) wrote:

Something you can do yourself?? There is nothing you cannot do, if you do some research, get the proper tools, and be both patient and kind to yourself. You will do it more slowly than a pro, you may have to tear up some work and start over, but you can do it.
I'd start with a trip to the library -- there are lots of "how to" books. Your relative may be a gold mine of information.

My thoughts are that you should assess your skills, read a couple of books. On the one hand, the money you save buying wholesale might go a long ways towards hiring a pro; on the other hand, it might buy or rent the tools you'' need -- and have enough left over. The good thing about hiring a pro is that it's done well and quickly, the good thing about doing it yourself is the bragging rights you get.
Ken
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Well, I am thinking about doing the same thing. Just last night I was over at the Armstrong/Bruce website reading their detailed installation instructions. Check it out here:
http://www.armstrong.com/resbrucewoodna/article4979.asp
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