Wood Bath Mat

Hi All, I was wondering if anybody has ever used a wooden bath mat. I saw a nice example in myer and I was wondering if they work well. I was also wondering if anybody has made one. The ones I have seen for sale in stores are made from pine that has been stained and sealed. When I did an internet search I saw some very nice cedar and teak mats. Im sure I could make one without much hassle. Anyway could anyone think of any negatives or positives for for the ideas above? Thanks in advance!
-- george lopez
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On Wed, 10 Jun 2009 15:35:30 -0500, george lopez <georgelopez66[at]gmail[dot]com> wrote:>Hi All,

Cedar, teak, white oak are all good "water" woods. A good mat should not slip. I have a rubber bath mat made from spent tires--but it rests on a concrete floor. Rubber may react with vinyl or other floorings/finishes.
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ditto on the teak or cedar......use waterproof glue or SS (blind / from the bottom) fasteners
SS fasteners I used in a wooden door mat were still "perfect" after ~15 years outside in SoCal
cheers Bov
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On Jun 10, 4:35 pm, george lopez <georgelopez66[at]gmail[dot]com> wrote:

I think what you're looking for is generically called a "duck board". They are used any where there's a wet/muddy surface that you need to stand/walk on. We had one in front of the laundry tubs for years.
Red
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george lopez <georgelopez66[at]gmail[dot]com> wrote in

wet wood;a great place for mold and mildew to grow.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

Test drive one in bare feet before you spend a lot of time or money on it. I always found them less than comfortable, if the ratio of cracks to boards was too high. Wide boards take forever to dry. Pretty much need a floor drain- once the wood is saturated, that water has to go somewhere.
-- aem sends...
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Guess it depends on one's habits. I dry off in the shower, step out and dry feet. Minimal moisture. Only reason I do this is so I don't get a blast of cool air. Sidebar: prevents shrinkage :-)
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wrote:

I dry off in the shower too. No need for any floor mats.
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On Jun 10, 3:35 pm, george lopez <georgelopez66[at]gmail[dot]com> wrote:

Teak unfinished or just oiled is best, there is good reason why its used for boat decks. When it gets messed up you just use Oxalic acid and scrub it.
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On Wed, 10 Jun 2009 16:39:47 -0700 (PDT), ransley

Visited Belize in recent years. A fellow pointed out a few houses that were built entirely from Mahogany. Belize was a large exporter of timber 30s -40s (?) and then the mass cutting and hurricanes shortened the supply.
Those homes were never painted, treated or anything else.
Now they may running out of lobster.
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