Wiring Double GFCI?

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I'm replacing the single 20A kitchen countertop duplex outlet with a double box and two 20A GFCIs (both side by side in the double box) fed by a single dedicated 20A circuit breaker.
Do I simply jumper Load to Load and Line to Line, or should I have the Load on the first GFCI feed the Line on the second GFCI with nothing attached to the Load on the second one? The circuit terminates at that box.
I've read that the second outlet doesn't particularly need to be a GFCI, but I want them both to be GFCI anyway. Humor me!
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On Sat, 19 Sep 2009 10:35:24 -0700 (PDT), Josh

You can wire it either way. If you do the in and out, you won't need wirenuts in the box, but tripping the upstream outlet will kill the other one.
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Hard to understand what is trying to be achieved.???? 1) If the two outlets are to work independently presumably one would feed both (live and neutral) from the common supply, from the single pole breaker. Into the line terminals. But have nothing wired to the load side at all?. 1a) However if each is to protect other non GFCI outlets 'downstream' those would be presumably be wired to the load terminals for each run, from each GFCI? 2) What one would not do is to common the load terminals (i.e connect a load to 'both' GFCI???? What would be the point??? 3) If the intention is to feed two live leads form a double pole breaker, with one live wire to each GFCI; it won't IMO work because there will automatically be unbalance in the common neutral; the moment something is plugged into the 'other' GFCI circuit. But as said WHAT IS the objective????
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This is incorrect, isn't it? Comments?
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wrote:

This is incorrect, isn't it? Comments?
He's feeding two gfci receptacles from one dedicated 20 amp circuit
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Understood. I was asking for comment on the hypothetical.
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wrote:

Understood. I was asking for comment on the hypothetical.
If you are asking if he can feed two GFCI outlets with an Edison (multiwire branch circuit) fed from a double pole breaker, the answer is yes
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It's unclear *which* you believe is incorrect, the wiring method, or the description of why it won't work.
Answer: both. The wiring method is indeed incorrect. The description of why it won't work is also incorrect, but needs only the addition of three words at the end -- "and powered on" -- to make it correct.
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On Sep 19, 8:34pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Really? With opposite phases (implied by "double pole breaker") I thought this was ok.
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Yes, really, for exactly the reason stated: as soon as anything is powered on, on either leg of the circuit, current flows in the neutral wire. The GFCI on the *other* leg of the circuit sees that the current in the neutral wire is not the same as the current in *its* hot wire, and trips.
If you want GFCI protection on the outlets of a multiwire circuit, there are only two ways to do it: with a double-pole GFCI breaker, or with a GFCI receptacle at *every* location you wish protected, wired to the LINE side only.
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wrote:

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wrote:

That's not correct. The *other* leg of the circuit does not see the neutral because it's attached to the line side of the other gfci. There is no connection between the load neutrals of either gfci

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Only if you split the multiwire circuit into two separate circuits at the first GFCI, which rather destroys the point of having a multiwire circuit in the first place.

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wrote:

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As long as the neutrals are separated at that point, I agree it will work fine. But it's not really a multiwire circuit any more.
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On Sep 20, 9:07am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Doug Since the purpose of using a multi wire branch circuit; which is commonly called an Edison circuit; is to save materials and labor I don't see how using one as the home run to the panel "destroys the point." -- Tom Horne
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On Sun, 20 Sep 2009 21:21:50 -0700 (PDT), Tom Horne

The other advantage of a MW circuit is voltage drop. That is why they commonly serve rooms on the opposite end of the house.
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Use a deep box as they take a lot of space, and wire them as gfretwell describes, although I prefer to pigtail the wiring under a wire nut rather than having two conductors per clamp.
OK, RBM....you're right about what I'm trying to accomplish. I just want the ability to occasionally plug more than two items in at that location at the same time without having to use a power strip or other outlet modifying/expanding contraption. And I *DO* want them to look the same, hence the double 20A GFCIs.
But you guys have got me thinking.....those fancy rectangular outlets which LOOK like GFCIs but don't have the breaker inside might be acceptable for the second slot. I suppose they come in 20A versions as well as 15A? They cost half what a GFCI costs. Maybe.......
Anyway, thanks for the advice. The consensus seems to be: wire the power in to the LINE connector of both receptacles, and nothing to the LOAD of either one.
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Or if you choose to use a non gfci "Decora" style receptacle, just feed it off the load of the gfci
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off the load of the gfci
The Decora....right. I think that's what I'll do, assuming they come in 20A versions. The GFCI and the Decora look close enough alike to give the outlet a symetrical look. A regular duplex beside a GFCI just wouldn't have looked right, IMHO.
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