wiring 220volts

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i have a work shop my fatherinlaw left me.he wired it 110volts from the outside panle box on the house.what do i have to do to get 220 to the shop for woodworking tools ------------------------------------- lee godfrey ___ _ ____ _ ___ / \__/ \__/ \__/ \__/ \ Hey Rocky! | _|@ @ __ | Watch me pull a rabbit \________/ | | \_________/ out of my hat! __/ _/ /) (o _/ \____/ | | | _ | _________|__( )__|_________ x/ _| |( . )| |_ \x |_| ---*|_|
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If you have to ask, you are best to hire an electrician. If it would be easy for the electrician to run a new wire and there is space in the panel for a new double breaker (2 slots), then it should not cost very much.
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On Thu, 12 Aug 2010 10:56:07 -0700, "Bill"

He can do it himself. He now is using 73 flashlight batteries in series to get 110 volts. Each battery is 1.5 volts. Just wire up 146 batteries in series to get 220Volts.
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On Fri, 13 Aug 2010 03:06:01 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

Don't you need some sort of pendulum with brushes to make alternating current.
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On 8/12/2010 10:04 AM wirehanger spake thus:

Easy; run new cable from the breaker panel to the shop (the type will depend on how and where the cable is installed), with the proper number of conductors (3 with ground: two hots, a neutral, and a ground). If the cable is exposed, you're going to need to use metal-clad (MC) cable. If it can be run inside a wall, you can use Romex. And you'll need a double-pole breaker in the breaker box (do *not* use two unconnected breakers--very bad!).
By the way, it's really 240 (nominal) volts, not 220. 120 volts X 2, dontcha know (or 480 / 2). Dunno why people still call it "220".
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

They call it that, because it used to be that years ago. The nominal line voltage was increased over the years in order to get more power (P=I*E) through the existing lines which limit the current capacity (I) leaving only the voltage that could be increased (E).
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On 8/12/2010 11:54 AM Pete C. spake thus:

OK, so back then it was 110 and 220. Makes sense.
Weird, the variety of nominal line voltages one reads over the decades. Lots of circuits used to indicate line voltage as 117 volts, for some strange reason. (As if it were *exactly* 117!)
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On Thu, 12 Aug 2010 12:02:33 -0700, David Nebenzahl

That's Fahrenheit. In Centigrade it comes out exactly 220.
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YES WE DO KNOW THAT YOU DON'T KNOW ANYTHING ABOUT ELECTRICITY??? 480 is never used in domestic power supplies and is limited even in commercial use, most of time is used in industrial work in order to cut size of wire down. however 208-240 is most common power to be used in commercial work and domestic, because one leg of 220 to neutral will render 110 for domestic use. I guess you most be magic electrician that picks up one leg of 480 and neutral to get 220 which I came across in CT.and I had few kind words with customer "I will never return to this job again",

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Grumpy wrote:

277/480V 3ph Wye service is the higher voltage complement to 120/208V service and is quite common in larger commercial buildings. This is also why 277V rated HID and fluorescent ballasts are very common.
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

Because "220" is a ROUND number. The numeral "4" is an ANGULAR number.
Round is, well, rounder, and that makes it better.
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On Thu, 12 Aug 2010 11:02:57 -0700, David Nebenzahl

For the same reason we call it 110.
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On Thu, 12 Aug 2010 17:04:35 +0000, leegodfrey40_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (wirehanger) wrote Re wiring 220volts:

You need to run a 220v circuit from the breaker panel to the shop. It would probably be a good idea to hire an electrician for the job.
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Is this a separate building? If so, you can't just add another feed or main. Check out the codes for what can and cannot be done with sub panels, grounds, etc. Sometimes it is cheaper to pay an electrician to do it right the first time.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/wiring-220volts-459176-.htm wirehanger wrote:
Ed Pawlowski wrote:

yes build is about 100ft from house. he ran a wire from outside house panle to shop.which is 110v. i need 220/240 in shop
------------------------------------- lee godfrey ___ _ ____ _ ___ / \__/ \__/ \__/ \__/ \ Hey Rocky! | _|@ @ __ | Watch me pull a rabbit \________/ | | \_________/ out of my hat! __/ _/ /) (o _/ \____/ | | | _ | _________|__( )__|_________ x/ _| |( . )| |_ \x |_| ---*|_|
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wirehanger wrote:

If the wire is in conduit there is a possibility you could fish in an extra wire. If wired to the current NEC you may also need a ground wire, if there was not one originally. I wouldn't bet on being able to refish.
If cable or direct burial wire you need to retrench.
If run overhead it could be easier.
The panel in the shop probably can handle a 240V feed (2 separate busbars. If not, you need to replace the shop panel.
Some motors run 120 or 240V (check the nameplate). The current would double at 120V - which may not work depending on the feeder breaker rating and feeder wire size. May be cheaper to change motors to 120V if they will work.
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It would work fine. A motor wired for 120V fed 240V would burn up so fast that you should find your wiring intact after you put out the flames.
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wrote:

Some motors are designed to be wired either 120 or 240 volts. You do make different connections in the motor's splice box, so you don't burn the motor up.
If the current 120 volt feeder to the shop is a piece of 14/2 UF cable, it's not going to run a 5 HP motor, even at 240 volts.
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if the motor is capable of having it's windings wired for both 120v and 240v and you have it in a 120v configuration while feeding it 240v, it will go up in smoke.
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Did somebody suggest connecting a 120 volt motor to 240 volts?

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