Wirenuts

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I swear I don't trust these things. You tighten the hell out of them but too often one wire does not get pulled in as far as the others and is still a bit wiggly, and there is no room to do much of an inspection or pull-test. They need to be made out of clear plastic with a square end you could twist with a socket wrench -- or maybe install the plastic insulator as a second step.
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There are wire nuts with wings to help grab them, Gardner Bender has a wrench to tighten theirs as well. The key is in lining the wires up evenly and holding them tightly as you spin on the wire nut. Like anything else, it takes practice

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Dave wrote:

You can over tighten them and you can use the wrong size nut for the size and number of wires. There are also different kinds of wire nuts.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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I always twist my wires together tightly with pliers before putting any kind of wire connector on them. It is important to have the correct size wire connector.

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Dave (galt snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com) said...

There have been discussions in here on whether you should pre-twist wires or not -- some wirenut manufacturers recommend it, some say you don't have to. I used to only pre-twist when more than two wires were being attached, or if stranded wire was involve.
I now always pre-twist for this reason: if you have a solid connection with nothing loose all on its own without a wirenut, then you know you have a good connection and the wirenut serves little more than an insulator for the joint.
Strip the ends of wires off at least a half inch more than needed. Line them all up so the end of each wire's insulation are even. Twist the wires using a pair of linesmans pliers so they are held together well. If you need to attached a stranded conductor, hand-twist it around the twisted solid conductors. Then cut off the twisted connection so that it is the right length so as not to protrude from the wirenut once it is installed (this also cuts away the "chewed up" end from the pliers!). Then attach the wirenut.
--
Calvin Henry-Cotnam
"Never ascribe to malice what can equally be explained by incompetence."
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... : : I now always pre-twist for this reason: if you have a solid connection : with nothing loose all on its own without a wirenut, then you know you : have a good connection and the wirenut serves little more than an : insulator for the joint. : : Strip the ends of wires off at least a half inch more than needed. Line : them all up so the end of each wire's insulation are even. Twist the : wires using a pair of linesmans pliers so they are held together well. : If you need to attached a stranded conductor, hand-twist it around the : twisted solid conductors. Then cut off the twisted connection so that it : is the right length so as not to protrude from the wirenut once it is : installed (this also cuts away the "chewed up" end from the pliers!). : Then attach the wirenut. ...
Same here; All I use the wire nuts for is insulation. I also tape them with rubber tape. Lots of people are going to disagree with this, but ... so be it <g>.
Pop
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I will triple that recommendation. I have even used tape occasionally.
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Pop ( snipped-for-privacy@devnull.spamcop.net) said...

[description of pre-twisting wires before using wirenuts snipped]

Not so much an argument (ie: an attempt to change your opinion) as just stating another opinion...
I don't bother with tape as I find that good wirenuts actually "bite" into the wire a bit and hold in place well. A well pre-twisted set of wires provides a good even surface for the wirenut to hold onto, and if I ever have to take the connection apart, I don't have to put up with a sticky mess.
If there's ever any reason to think the wirenut may come loose (and I have had the situation, sometimes especially where stranded conductors are concerned), I will use the type of wirenut that has a stud that clamps on the wires, then you screw the plastic cover onto the stud.
--
Calvin Henry-Cotnam
"Never ascribe to malice what can equally be explained by incompetence."
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Ditto.

I always twist, no tape. PS Knight (the Canadian wiring bible) makes a remark that it's usually a sign that the electrician stripped the wires too long, and the tape is to hide the bare bits. Went on to remark that an inspector will often tear the tape off to check the workmanship for just that reason.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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said... : : > [description of pre-twisting wires before using wirenuts snipped] : : > >Same here; All I use the wire nuts for is insulation. I also : > >tape them with rubber tape. Lots of people are going to disagree : > >with this, but ... so be it <g>. : : > Not so much an argument (ie: an attempt to change your opinion) as just : > stating another opinion... : : Ditto. : : > I don't bother with tape as I find that good wirenuts actually "bite" : > into the wire a bit and hold in place well. A well pre-twisted set of : > wires provides a good even surface for the wirenut to hold onto, and if : > I ever have to take the connection apart, I don't have to put up with : > a sticky mess. : : I always twist, no tape. PS Knight (the Canadian wiring bible) : makes a remark that it's usually a sign that the electrician stripped : the wires too long, and the tape is to hide the bare bits. Went : on to remark that an inspector will often tear the tape off : to check the workmanship for just that reason.
True. But usually only one, in my experience. Usually, unless you make a mess of it, all they do is press a thumbnail into the tape to feel for the edge of the insulation strip - it's not hard to find. I also leave a tiny "flap" on the end of the tape, just in case I want to untape it someday, and I've had a few "somedays" due to changed minds, too. He spotted the flap and used it to unwind the first one, then just "thumbed" the rest on my latest inspection. I like the tape because it keeps bugs etc. out and it looks nice and isn't that much trouble to do for me.
Pop
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I've been known to tape outdoor connections (usually not AC), but I figure if I'm worried about bugs with wirenuts, those same circumstances will cause electrical tape to trap moisture and cause corrosion. Bugs are better than corrosion.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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: : > I like the tape because it keeps bugs etc. out and it looks : > nice and isn't that much trouble to do for me. : : I've been known to tape outdoor connections (usually not AC), but : I figure if I'm worried about bugs with wirenuts, those same : circumstances will cause electrical tape to trap moisture and : cause corrosion. Bugs are better than corrosion. : -- : Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est : It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
LOL, obviously. Tape wrap collects moisture & bugs don;t?
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Without the tape wrap it it can dry out. If the tape wrap isn't perfect, and/or deteriorates slightly, driven rain or snow can get in and stay there for quite a while.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Chris Lewis wrote:

A friend of mine was a union electrician for probably 35 years before his death. He taught me to always tape wirenut connections. Neither he nor I ever used it to hide anything, and I never saw him make any connection that was less than perfect.
When I push my wiring into the box, especially a crowded box, I know that nothing is going to rub any wirenut loose.
--
If John McCain gets the 2008 Republican Presidential nomination,
my vote for President will be a write-in for Jiang Zemin.
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I always twist the wires with lineman pliers then cut the ends off even. (I wouldn't even need the wirenuts except for insulating of the connections). Connecting a solid to a stranded wire can be a problem. With those I have better luck first bending a 'ripple' into the solid wire. Kevin
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they make screwdrivers with a "socket" in the handle that fits over wirenuts and aids in tightening them.
Ideal is one manufacturer fo these screwdrivers.
I do like the idea of clear wirenuts though...that would be neat.
also, though a lot of people, including myself, twist the wires together by pliers before installing the wirenut its not a good practice. The wirenut is designed to do all the twisting and tightening.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Not good practice? Twisting the wires before capping with the wirenut is not going to do anything but insure a good connection. Cheap insurance.
R
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wrote: : > : > also, though a lot of people, including myself, twist the wires : > together by pliers before installing the wirenut its not a good : > practice. The wirenut is designed to do all the twisting and : > tightening. : : Not good practice? Twisting the wires before capping with the wirenut : is not going to do anything but insure a good connection. Cheap : insurance. : : R : No, that depends on a few things, including the design and construction of the wirenut - they're not a one size fits all deal.
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On 21 Jan 2006 08:00:45 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I don't understand.
My wife is designed to do the cooking and cleaning, but why would it not be a good practice to get my daughter to help her.
Why is not a good practice to help the wirenut?
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
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Dave wrote:

I like the idea of clear plastic.
I always use wirenuts with a "live spring". The spring does not have hard plastic behind it and will deform over the wires giving a longer length of the spring squeezing the wires together. Made by Buchanan, 3M and others.
bud--
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