Window or toilet

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Well, now any savings are pretty slim. All you are improving is the infiltration loss. The room will be more comfortable, but I doubt you will measure much in the way of savings unless the thermostat is in that room and was cycling too much, thus overheating the rest of the house while trying to maintain the living room temperature.
Even if you were upgrading to a double pane window, $50 was rather optimistic. After all, even a small house may have 1000 sq ft of ceiling and another 1000 sq ft of walls, and all you would have been doing was raising the R value on 32 sq ft from 1 to 3.
But for $200, it's an inexpensive upgrade and a more comfortable living room. I'm surprised they even make a single pane window that large anymore.
--
Dennis


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Thanks, that was a pretty good summary.
Frankly I'm surprised they do too - but as luck would have it.
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Eigenvector wrote:

While there could be somewhere that the cost of power is extremely low and water very high that may be different, most any place in the world would favor the window.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Eigenvector wrote: ...

I doubt if it will improve performance, the old one made up for less ideal engineering with lots of water.
--
Joseph Meehan

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I would get the new window. Then repair the toilet. Serach for instructions on how to clean the toilet with Muratic Acid. Worked wonders on mine.
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1. Replace the window as the first priority -- It's value to the house is the most evident -- especially if you put the house on the market (assuming your price of $200 is accurate -- that seems low for an insulated or dual pane window).
2. Check at places like Habitat's resale store or other charity resale locations for a low-volume efficient flush toilet. You can afford to wait until the right one shows up because your present one is still working.
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Assuming you live in the USA, you can get a tax credit for the window, but only if you replace it by the end of 2007. It'll be 10% of the cost (insert usual disclaimers here :). http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=Products.pr_tax_credits#chart Again, the credit expires at the end of this year, so I'd do the window first.
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single pane vinyl window would almost assuredly not qualify. (Also note that $50/month savings in the winter is not much more than $10/month year round (if these figures are in anyway accurate). Perhaps the solution is the toilet plus caulking around the window (or as one poster suggested, drapes).
--
Peace,
BobJ



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