Why not multigrade in lawnmower?

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I bought a lawn mower and a tiller. Both came with jugs of 30w oil. Question. Why not use a good multigrade in them instead of the 30w?
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Ook wrote:

I suggest 5W30 Mobil 1. It has all the characteristics of a straight weight 30 conventional except it doesn't get as thick when cold, can stand a lot higher temperatures and has little or no viscosity improvers. The worst part of conventional multi grade is that it contains lots of Viscosity Improvers. It can be bad news for a hot running engine.
Amzoil ad but says the same thing:
http://tinyurl.com/bp2z8
See the section titled:
WHAT ABOUT ENGINES THAT “REQUIRE” A STRAIGHT WEIGHT OIL?
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Rich256 wrote:

Second the M1 5W30, I use it in pretty much everything but the two cycle stuff and it seem to work very well.
Pete C.
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I run Rotella 5w 40 synthetic in everything. It a diesel rated synthetic that tests out better than Mobil 1 at a better price. I have a lot of engines and needed something that would work in all of them. I use it in everything form the 4 stroke weed wacker to the backhoe.
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I don't think you can use the word "good" and "multi-grade oil" in the same sentence. I use straight 30 in everything I own. Always have, always will.
--
Steve Barker




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Ook <Ook Don't send me any freakin' spam at zootal dot com delete the Don't send me any freakin' spam> wrote:

Uhhh, because you already have the 30w they came with?
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Ook wrote:

They are probably air cooled so the single weight may provide more protection at high temp. just a guess...
nate
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You got 30w with them because its cheaper for the manufacturer. A multi grade synthetic is better.
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m Ransley wrote:

Single grade used to be cheaper, most places you can even find it. You don't need anything better. than a good multigrade. I think using single grade is a big myth just using non detergent oil.
My lawnmower motors last till everything else falls apart. I have used multigrade for a long time (at least 10W-30 and 10W-40 is probably better. Change the oil at least once a season, two times is better, and at least every 25 hours. Clean the air filter at least every season and adjust the carb correctly as needed, about 1/2 way between rpm fall off at two rich and two lean; too lean burns valves so stay toward rich side.
Biggest point is having the engine full of oil and keeping the oil clean.
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Most lawn equipment wont be operated below 32f maybe many manufacturers therefor don't recommend or see the need for multigrade where cold starting benefits from lower oil weight. Synthetics are proven to reduce wear, something many small engines need because of poor design. My generator recommends synthetic. Many small cheap motors only have a design life of 250-350 hours, commercial users need more and do benefit from synthetic.
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Another thought that occurs to me. Small engines, like lawn mowers, don't have oil pumps and therefore you don't have bearings that are pressure lubricated. They don't have the tight clearances that bigger engines have, and therefore using a straight 30w probably doesn't hurt anything. In a bigger engine, if you switch to a thicker oil, tight clearences that were lubricated with the thinner oil might not be lubricated with the heavier oil, and will wear. You go back to a thinner oil and you might experience oil consumption. This is what they taught in internal combustion engine class I took many years ago - not sure if anyone has actually proved this in the field or not.
So, any general consensus? Stick with a straight 30 synthetic and don't worry about it?

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wrote:

John Deere recommended Turf-Gard (their brand) in 10w-30. I figure they oughtta know, so that's what I use.
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...and Zippo says only use Zippo fuel in their lighters. I wonder what they pay for a barrel of generic Naptha?
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wrote:

It's a $5000 tractor; I think I can afford a couple of quarts of overpriced oil a year.
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For that, no argument here!! I didn't catch what level of JD it was. Guess even their pushers (if they even make those) are decent.
Don't need the warranty being argued because it's claimed the customer used inferior oil. I'd even keep the oil receipts!
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Ook wrote:

Because that is a remnant of the pre-synthetic days. Standard multi-grade oils don't perform well in an air cooled small motor. They tend to break down and end up as 10W and worse. Synthetic oils however can handle the heat and should be fine.
Thanks for the question, because it is time for an oil change on my mower and I believe I am out of 30W but I have good synthetic around. I will switch. I just had not thought of it.
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Joseph Meehan

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Do the air cooled engines get that much hotter? I'm using penzoil 10-30, but it's been pretty cool this summer, and I've not mowed in temps above 70.
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Ook wrote:

Yes, and it is cheap insurance to put in a good synthetic. They seem to stay cleaner a lot longer too.
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Ook wrote:

The problem is uneven heat. Some spots are much hotter than they would be in a water cooled engine since water carries away far more heat per volume area than air.
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Because single weight is cheaper and the manufacturer doesn't think synthetics or multiweights are necessary. If you use them, they won't hurt anything but your pocketbook.
You're not going to run either machine in sub-freezing temps or go for 150,000 miles.
You might check out the website of the engine manufacturer, perhaps Tecumseh or Briggs & Stratton, (as opposed to the lawn motor/tiller manufacturer) for more info.
Ook wrote:

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