Why arn't light bulbs in the US like the ones in UK?

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Slipped a disc.
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Chief wrote:

Who f*ckin cares? Probably slipped a disc or something.
* Pass The X
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) wrote:

It's not the "getting loose" that bothers me although indeed I've had one where the sprung contact in the base was permanently pushed down and the bulb made an intermittent contact even when tightened as much as possible. It's the screw becoming welded into the socket that's the problem and it usually occurs with a rarely used light at the limit of the available ladder. The result is a broken bulb and sometimes cut fingers.
-- Patrick Riley
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If you think they have a better idea, you can always move there. There are many things in Europe that I would rather do without.
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The Wobulator wrote:

I've lived with both. Apart from any differences in the quality of the sockets both have some disadvantages IMHO. UK style bayonet. Contact pressure on the two contacts on the base usually depends on two small springs inside the small piston style electrodes of the socket. The bayonet style bulb is inserted, pressed down, turned a few degrees; two pins, one each side of the bulb engaging with hooked slots in the socket (as somebody said, as some automobile lamps) and then released with the small springs maintaining the contact pressure and holding the bulb in place. I found that a very small screwdriver was required to attach wires within the base of many UK bulb sockets and if one of the small screws went astray they were hard to find/replace. Also that any damage to the hooked slots could cause, occasionally, bulb to be loose or wobbly in the socket. many sockets were brass and of good quality. North American (Edison Screw). While NA polarized plugs are now more common it is possible for the outside of the bulb socket to be 'live' if improperly wired. However one's fingers are not usually down at the base of the bulb and if one is prudent the lamp/circuit is switched 'off'! Because of the lower voltage (115-120) compared to 230, the current at each bulb is higher i.e. twice. However with the relatively large contact area of the screw in base and the metal contact on the bottom, unless there has been corrosion, doesn't seem to be a problem. It does require several 'turns' to screw them in, but this sets the contact pressure required. I think the screw in type does allow cheaper materials to be used for construction but this is only a personal opinion and UK experience now out of date. Both work. Bulbs are an inefficient source of light. Many lamps are now made in China or somewhere. Current price for a package of four 40s, 60s or 100 watters is here (eastern Canada at Can. Tire/Wal Mart etc.) around 88 Can. cents, plus sales tax; or approximately UK 44 pence (11 pence each). So they are cheap enough even compared to the price of the electricity they waste. (Well if one is heating with electricity anyway, during the winter, that heat is part of ones heating bill!). Cheers.
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Because it is a fix looking for a problem. In over 50 years I have never seen a problem related to screw in lamps. I have seen problems with both systems, but not related to design as they both share the problems, generally do to poor materials and or design.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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who gives a flying f#ck about the UK.
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I'm told that the light bulbs on the subways in New York City have a left hand thread -- you turn them to the right to remove the bulbs.
I know why.... or so I'm told..... to cut down on theft.
--

Christopher A. Young
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Yes, they do. But not all of them.
Many also run on the 600v DC track voltage, which is fed in series through 5 sockets.
Temporary lights on construction projects are also left hand thread. To cut down on theft, and to prevent the use of receptacle adaptors in the non-gfci protected 2-circuit stringers.
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sounds like another case of "the grass appears greener from the other side of the fence".bet you, that in the UK there are people who wish they had our light bulbs. people always want what the other guy has,you should see my buddies wife!

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