Who can install a chimney liner?

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Hi,
Contractor quotes do not cease to amuse me. I have had several quotes for installing a liner in my chimney and connecting it to a fireplace insert. I provide both. Each contractor described it as a piece of cake: "We attach it at the top of the chimney, cap it, seal it, drop it down and then connect it at the bottom." So how much is it going to cost me? The quotes ranged from $950-$1800.
I've been calling professional chimney repairers and stone guys. So, obviously, these guys don't want the job. Who else can reliably do this kind of job? Obviously, I want someone insured and bonded.
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron
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I think you have your answer. Much like how much is this item worth? Sell it on ebay, and find out.
But, since you can post here I reckon you are considering the job yourself, and why not. The liner comes in 3' sections, you fasten them together and drop them down.
Now, I've never done this --- so --- you don't necessarily have to take my advice.
Here are the questions that you'd like to know if you do it yourself:
Is there something supporting the liner in the middle where you can't get to?
Where does the liner have to end up - exactly - for you to install the insert.
And of course the easy ones like what do you fasten the tubes with, do you need to sweep chimney first, how do you cap it, etc.
Well, I wasn't much help. But, I didn't hurt much either, did I?
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insured and bonded labor 50% of the cost materials about 30%
I think my point is made.
--
Colbyt
Please come visit www.househomerepair.com
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Contact a CERTIFIED Chimney Sweep. Look on this industry site for a list in your area: http://www.CSIA.org .
--
John Galbreath Jr.
Birmingham, Alabama
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A good HVAC guy will install a flue liner.
s

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Ask the Maid or your lawyer
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Not sure exactly what is wanted here. By saying these guys don't want the job, are you implying that because you got a range of quotes for $950 to $1800 that even the lowest is unreasonable? Do you know what the cost of the actual liner is?
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On Sat, 24 Jan 2009 01:14:29 -0800 (PST), ransley

more shit from a shithead like ransley. Bubba
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This coming from the guy that tried to tell us over and over that hot water doesn't evaporate more readily than cold water. Get your GED yet, Bubba?
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On Sat, 24 Jan 2009 15:51:43 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

and when you try what I told you, you just might begin to get a clue. Its not going to evaporate any better with hot water. Hell, by the time your so called hot water hits the distribution tray at the top of your humidifier its already cooled down to nothing. Oh thats right. You're one of those freaking mindless EE that thinks they know everything about everything but cant even figure out why their furnace doesnt work until one of those guys that needs a (how did you put it?) "gets a GED", comes over and charges them $100 to change their dirty filter. You probably put pieces of copper in your outdoor disconnect for your air conditioner too thinking you'll save money. Heres a quarter, trader. Go buy a vowel. Bubba
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So, you want to continue to curse the darkness instead of learning. I think someone already provided you with what Aprilaire, widely recognized as one of the best humidifier manufacturers has to say. But, here it is from their Q/A section again for you:
"Should our humidifier be connected with hot or cold water?"
All of our flow-through units can be connected to hot or cold water. Hot water increases the evaporative capacity of your humidifer, provides more humidity to the home and offers more flexibility in the operation of the humidifier. Some of our units can use hot air and cold water. All humidifiers need some source of heat for evaporation to take place whether it is hot water or hot air. We would recommend that if our power units are installed on the return ductwork, that they be connected to hot water, as this is their only heat source. Heat pumps and large capacity installations need hot water. Heat pumps are not hot enough for evaporation and some larger installations need maximum capacity so they will need to use both hot air and hot water. The Model 400 should be connected to cold water due to the wicking Water Panel as it cannot be guaranteed that the water will stay hot while waiting for the next heat call on the Water Panel. With any drain-though Aprilaire Humidifier connected to hot water, the heat in the water is used in the evaporation process and the water coming out of the drain will be cold to the touch."
Now, I'm sure you'll smear Aprilaire with some choice cuss words too. And probably claim they have some ulterior motive. But the facts speak for themselves. Aprilaire clearly states that using hot water, you get more evaporation.
Your statement that the hot water has already cooled down to nothing by the time it hits the top of the distribution tray is quite laughable. The water drops about 1/2 inch from where it enters to the top of the tray. Anyone with a pulse should know that the water isn't going to cool very much at all in that short distance and time.

Heh, Bubba, didn't you ever hear the line about not bringing a knife to a gun fight? Unable to argue simple physics which you don't understand, you're reduced to sneering in contempt at those that have chosen to educate themselves.
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On Sun, 25 Jan 2009 06:37:40 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

No trader, your problem is you believe all the shit you read. Again, for the millionth time, TRY it yourself. You'll find that using hot water does next to nothing in adding moisture. How hard is it for you to hook up two saddle valves, one on the hot, the other on the cold. Do some temp measurements and catch the excess water from the drain. How freaking hard is that? Your stupid simplicity bores me. Go read another bedtime story. I guess you really belive the three little bears story was true too? Bubba
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Bubba wrote:

I take that to mean you admit you were wrong and apologize for the confusion.
Did I get that right?
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wrote:

Apparently, you have a difficult time with English comprehension too. So sad for you. Bubba
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Bubba wrote:

You needn't go on and on... One 'I'm sorry' (or words to that effect) was sufficient. Heck, I don't even think your faux pas even merits an act of contrition! Glad to have you back amongst the civil.
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wrote:

Are you finding words I didn't type? Yeah, I thought so. Kind of a delusional fellow, aren't you? Bubba
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Way ahead of you Bubba. I am going to run a little experiment to measure the difference. Won't require 2 saddle valves either. I'm just going to wait for a convenient time, then measure first as is with hot water running into the humidifier. Then I'm going to either turn off the water heater before a trip or otherwise deplete the hot water by turning off the heater and then doing laundry, running dishwasher, etc. I'll simply measure the flow rate of the drain water with hot vs cold.
That's the benefit of being smart, you don't have to re-plumb anything. Maybe you're right Bubba and Aprilaire and every other poster and the laws of physics are wrong. But I'll bet not :)
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On Mon, 26 Jan 2009 06:46:09 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Thank You, That's all I ask. You will be suprised of your findings. I did it and it was very very very little added moisture. Not even worth mentioning and making the water heater run that much more. Id rather run more cold water through it than fuel. By the way, I really didnt re-plumb anything per say. A simple, second, self piercing saddle valve and move the 1/4 line over to the other line. Took about 2 mins and I have all the parts handy in my service van. That way Im not doing laundry or dishes with cold water. Have a nice day. Bubba
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Just for the record, you're using fuel to heat the water either way. If you use hot water, part of the heating is done by the water heater. If you use cold water, all the heat is provided by the furnace.

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On Mon, 26 Jan 2009 16:36:44 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

On the contrar.........no Im not. When I use cold water I do indeed rely on the heat from the gas to evaporate the water across the humidifier pad. However, when Im using cold water, I use no more heat than if it were hot water. My thermostat controls my furnace so it only uses the fuel required to reach my temp setpoint. If there is not enough humidity, my furnace still shuts off at temp setpoint. If I use hot water my water heater is being used and I still use the same amount of heat to reach my furnace temp set point. Now you might start in about how the moisture in the home holds more heat and thus would allow a lower temp setting in the house but I dont see it that way. I set my temp at 70 no matter what humidity setting I use. Bubba

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