What's the trick to mowing grass on a steep hill with a gas push mower

Page 3 of 4  

In wrote:

Electric CAN be great, depending on how long the extension cord would be. Next time you're in the store or online, check the wire gauge and length it can be used with. The lower the GA number, the longer the Feet in length the cord can be. Most stock cords seem to be only 18 Ga and I've seen them as large as 12 Ga, but nothing larger. 12 GA might get you the distance; you'll have to check and see. I don't think you need to pay a LOT of attention to starting currents with mowers; it's running current that matters. The motors seem to live OK with an extended spin-up time, but extended run times with insufficient current/voltage might burn out the motors quicker. Working on my back yard fence, I once used an electric stapler that charged a capacitor for the "shooting" power. At 100' it could still work but the punches were weak, and at 150' it couldn't charge the cap to the OK to Fire limit or however they do it. Out came the emergency genset! Even the 100' cord made the thing too weak to set the set the 9/16" staples completely.
Other posts have good info, too.
HTH,
Twayne`
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

10AWG is available at the BORG and OWES, but it's pricey. All cords are a PITA to pull around and put away, but the larger the wire the harder it gets, exponentially.

Get a larger extension cord.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Elmo wrote:

At the farm, a string trimmer with a shoulder strap and 30" handlebars was an easy way to mow creek banks. The strap was adjusted so the head would float level at the desired height. Then the handlebars were adjusted for best control. I could cut a 5' swath, so it was fairly quick.
For neater cutting almost like a mower, I could use a disk head with 3 pivoting nylon blades about 5" long.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

But is level good for a steep hill? And say it's put at the angle for the hill, when one turns to either side, it won't be at the right angle anymore. Still, it might still work if he doesn't do much turning. I hate to be a pain, but I can't seem to help it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mm wrote:

Adjusting the harness so the head will be level at the desired height is best for mowing on level ground or slopes. I wouldn't try to mow a creek bank walking up or down. That would mean reaching below foot level on my way down or bringing the head up near face level on my way up.
I'd walk along the slope and use the handlebars to tip the trimmer sideways parallel to the slope. With the handlebars I would also swing the trimmer to clear a wide swath.
If instead of mowing at a certain level I were trying to cut weeds at ground level, I'd shorten the strap so that the head of the trimmer was at a toe-down attitude.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 01:01:44 -0400, J Burns wrote:

This wikipedia picture implies the hover mower actual coverage is not much different than a weed whacker. Certainly the plastic blades are vastly smaller than the deck in area.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawn_mower
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Elmo wrote:

With line, my trimmer can cut a 17" circle, almost as big as my mower. I sweep side to side, so one walking pass is equal to three mower passes. My lawn is half an acre. At some times of the year, weed stems can pop up several inches almost overnight. In a case like that, with little grass to mulch, it can be quicker and easier to mow with my trimmer than with my mower.
Neighbors have a steep bank between the walk and the curb. I mow it when they're away. I mow along the slope so I'm not above or below the mower. Whether I push or pull, the mower is cocked because it slides sideways downhill. It would be easy to damage their mower. I wouldn't use my own more for that.
If nobody's looking, I use my trimmer, instead. It's easier, it's safer, there's no risk of mechanical damage, and the result looks about like mowing with a dull blade. The strap and wide handlebars give me control.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A couple ideas I didn't see in the reset of the thread: 1) Masticator. Lots of different designs, from what I understand. 2) Fire. A nice little (maybe) control burn.
m
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have the same problem. I end up "crabbing" my way across the slope. (You know, aiming the mower "up slope" but having it track across the slope.)
My wife's relatives have a property on the water. There is a very steep slope in the transition between the lawn and the rifraft which keeps erosion in line.
They mow this section using two people. One operates the lawnmower and the other holds a line attacked to the mower. The "line tender" puts enough tention to counter the effects of gravity putting it down the slope. It works well.
I never watched long enough to see how they "turned around."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Elmo wrote the following:

A sickle or scythe.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
willshak wrote:

(snip)
Talk about ER bait. Assuming you can even find one anywhere, using one of those puppies is definitely a hard skill to master. Even assuming you don't gash yourself, if your back is in less than great shape, you will hurt at the end of the day.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

And I'm sure it doesn't help that it's on a hill here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It depends on the length of the slope. I have a short banking and bought a cheap electric corded mower. I put a rope around the handle (length depends on banking length), stand at the top, and simply drag the mower up and down.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The one in this thread is between 100 and 150 feet.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Jun 2010 05:33:03 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

That's a mistake. FIRST do something stupid, then post here to tell us about it, or have your widow do so. We love a good laught

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Walk up and down a steep slope enough, and you'll see the only "safe" way to mow a slope is sideways. If you try mowing DOWN the hill, you could slip (especially if the grass is damp) and end up with your foot under the mower. If you push the mower UP the slope, you could slip and have the mower roll back down onto your foot, hand, or whatever.
Of course, even mowing sideways has limits. The gravity feed carbs on many mowers will not supply fuel properly when tilted, or the mower could flip sideways if the slope is too steep.
The best way to "mow" a slope is with a weed eater (string line trimmer), or get some goats to do it for you.
Better yet, if you're going to live here a while, cover the slope in plants or other groundcover that don't need mowing, or terrace the slope to provide level areas you can mow (and use).
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HerHusband wrote:

Here's a picture of a guy mowing with a string trimmer.
http://media.thestar.topscms.com/images/60/3a/a4b3c6e44fc79e856e7fc825a708.jpeg
The slant of the man shows that the photo has been rotated and in fact he is mowing a steep slope.
The wide handlebars give him control to do a fairly neat mowing job. The harness lets him stand upright with the weight of the brush cutter balanced at hip level. That way, he could cut for hours without much fatigue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, June 11, 2010 at 12:33:03 AM UTC-5, Elmo wrote:

I have the same problem. I simply take it slow push and pull, in short moves to avoid falling. ( I have an old military injury to the knees.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/29/2015 11:59 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The trick is to look at the date on the post (june 2010) before replying.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 06/30/2015 07:12 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

and how will that help with the mowing?
[snip improper sig delimiter]
--
Jesus loves the Ku Klux Klanners, Jesus loves the KKK, Pointy hats and
flowing robes, Burning crosses, homophobes! Jesus loves the Klanners of
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.