What's the trick to mowing grass on a steep hill with a gas push mower

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Elmo wrote:

I feel your pain.
I have a pond and a lake. When I bought the property, both had almost no slope. Result? A 5-10 yard zone of muck into which anything that ventured on to it would sink. So I got a large track hoe out here and had a proper bank made in most areas...moved maybe 1000 yards of material. Result? No more muck but a steep and unmowable bank.
The solution to an unmowable bank can be either... A. Roundup and/or B. A ground cover. I used wedelia. It is nicely invasive and looks decent. Freezes but comes back (in Florida).
Oh yeah...one more possible solution: goats.
--

dadiOH
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On Jun 11, 1:33 am, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

There is no trick. You simply use one of these (pick the model that matches your requirements)
http://www.flymo.com/node2417.aspx?nid=16702
Just swing it back and forth as you traverse the slope.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:

I had no idea they still made those! Or maybe started making them again. I see Husqvarna has the name. Do they sell them in the US?
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On Fri, 11 Jun 2010 08:17:33 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03 wrote:

Going to that page clued me in that the real solution is something called a "slope mower".
It's out of the budget for now ... but in the future ... I think this is self-leveling slope mower (up to 34°) might be just the way to go!
The slope I have is steeper than that in this picture but it gives an idea: 72LC All-Terrain Slope Mower: http://www.deweze.com/deweze/ATM/ATM.html
This one goes to 40 and the pictures are a bit more like the slope that I have, only it's much rougher and less even and there are trees all around in my slope.
SuperSlopeMaster SSM38-72D http://www.kutkwick.com/superslopemaster.htm
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On Jun 11, 11:53 am, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

I live in the US but used to be part of a "global team" with members from Australia.
Other than the time difference making conference calls and prompt responses a bit difficult, we had a great time comparing life in the US with life "down under".
It was an Aussie who told me about the Fly-Mo. He said he had one and that they are great on slopes. He said he has one area where he lowered it down on 2 ropes and could swing it back and forth.
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On Fri, 11 Jun 2010 09:06:19 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03 wrote:

I don't think I fully understand the "fly mo" hover mower.
Can I just tie a rope to the handle and lower it down from the top of the slope bank and walk back and forth at the top of the hill holding the flymo on the grade with the rope?
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On Jun 11, 1:29 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

Dunno...I'm just telling you what I remember from a few years back when I first heard of "hovering mowers". The guy had some way of controlling it with a rope. Mayby he just lowered the mower striaght up and down.
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Elmo wrote:

You'd probably need to attach much closer to the bottom - near the vertical center-of-mass ideally.
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think grouncover, whatever is common to your area and very hardy.
less wqork no maintence, nice flowers of some sort.
a real win win win
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On Fri, 11 Jun 2010 08:17:33 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Why would that be less dangerous? It says nothing about hills on the webpage and it seems to me that if it's floating, it's even easier to get your foot under it.
Not only that, if it's heavy, its tendenecy is to keep all 4 wheels on the ground. Since the user of the flymo will be uphill from the mower, won't every time he lowers his arms cause the front of the mower to go up and the rear to go down, making for a very uneven cut and a blade that can easily throw things at anyone in front of it.
Just some thoughts. Maybe I'm wrong. But I don't see why this is especially suited for a slope.
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On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 00:40:49 -0400, mm wrote:

I looked up hover mowers (electroluc flymo, eastman industries hover mower, allen, draper, etc.).
The marketing makes it seem so simple, but there must be a good reason why we're all not using a hover mower.
One problem is that they apparently can't cut high grass; another is they reputedly don't work well on uneven surfaces; yet another, I'm told, is that rocky soil (which is what I have) chips the weak plastic blades; yet another is that the blades are purportedly puny, about 2 inches, so hover mowing a large area might not be a whole lot better than whacking with the weed whacker.
They seem to be available in 4 stroke, 2-stroke, and in 110/220 corded.
This hover mower idea might work, especially if it can hold itself on a bank being controlled by a rope ... but that remains to be seen whether it can actually be remotely controlled from the top of the slope.
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On Jun 12, 1:57 am, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

re: " I looked up hover mowers"
Where?
re: "the weak plastic blades"
The HoverMowerT site (aka Eastman Industries) says:
"Stainless steel blades for long life and clean cut"
re: "the blades are purportedly puny, about 2 inches"
Come on...where are you getting your info?
Once again, the HoverMowerT site (aka Eastman Industries) says:
Cut Width: 19 inches
re: "can't cut high grass"
I'm not sure what your definition of "high grass" is, but the HoverMowerT can be set for a cut height of 4". That must mean it can cut grass higher than that. It doesn't say how much higher, but it's gotta be higher that 4" if it can cut it *down* to that height.
As I said earlier, I'm not endorsing them, I'm just quoting from their website.
"For a fast professional cut on steep slopes, wet grounds, lake banks, sand traps, retaining walls and awkward hard to reach angles HoverMowerT is the answer!"
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Are you looking for a hover mower's web site that specifically says that they are good for slopes?
Stolen without permission from:
http://www.hovermower.com/hovermower.htm
"For a fast professional cut on steep slopes, wet grounds, lake banks, sand traps, retaining walls and awkward hard to reach angles HoverMowerT is the answer!"
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On Jun 11, 1:33 am, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

So you need to mow down a hill ?
Are you talking about just mowing grass or are their thicker weeds and small brush plants in that area also ?
Why on earth do you think that a lawnmower would be the best tool to use in that area ? Along that same line, why do you think that it would be safer to buy a huge lawn tractor just to be able to mow that small section of your property ?
Consider the following:
(1.) Using a string trimmer/weed whacker with a heavy duty blade installed to "mow" this area. The equipment is smaller and it will therefore take longer, but the job will be done.
(2.) Consider purchasing the correct tool for such an application, along the lines of something like this:
A "Self-propelled field and brush trimmer": http://www.drpower.com/Field-Brush-Mower.aspx
OR
A "Trimmer/Mower": http://www.drpower.com/trimmer-Mower.aspx
(3.) Planting "wild" plants in the area which will look "good" in their natural untamed and un-manicured state.
If you continue to use your normal lawnmower in applications it was not designed to handle you will eventually injure yourself, you have been lucky thus far, but I would not continue to push your luck.
~~ Evan
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Elmo wrote:

A plug-in electric mower would be way lighter and easier to handle. It would have no problem with lubrication on a slope.
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re: "A plug-in electric mower ...."
OK, everybody that hates corded landscaping equipment please raise your hand.
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On Fri, 11 Jun 2010 11:08:47 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I don't like them but in some ways they're great. ARe there trees or bushes that would make it hard to manage the cord?
OP, what did the previous owner do? Does he have all his toes?
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Don't mow it.
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On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 00:43:22 -0400, mm wrote:

Yes. Both. But not too many. Mostly it's tall grass. It seems a weakness of the hover mowers is tall grass and uneven surfaces. I have both.
I guess if I kept it mowed nicely, both would subside ... but that means I still need to mow it all at least once with a mower than can handle tall grass (or a weed whacker).
Since the hover mower reputedly has a very small swath (much smaller than the area of the deck), it might not be much better than a weed whacker. I'm still looking things up though ...
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On Sat, 12 Jun 2010 05:59:46 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

Maybe the deck is so big to keep one from getting his toes cut off.
I knew a professional gardener who keep a jar of toes in pickle juice in his office.

Just kidding.
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