What relay do I want?

I have a 1.5hp well pump on a 20a circuit at my cottage. I like to turn the pump off during the week, but the switch is in a very inconvenient place. I would like to replace the switch with a 120v relay, and run a switch off it to near the front door.
I went to the local electrical supply and they recommended Grainger. I checked Graingers catalog and they have thousands of relays.
Any idea which of them I want? Any alternate ideas/suppliers? Thanks.
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Why not just use a 3 way switch?
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Using a relay would over complicate the wiring. Just run a 12/2 cable from a junction box ahead of the existing safety disconnect, to the new switch location you want and break one leg through a 20 amp switch

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jack wrote:

Just get a cheapo 120v coil DPDT rated at least 20A on the contacts.
Better still: http://www.swimmingpooltimeswitch.com/CD-104P.html
Also, Intermatic makes these.
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G. Morgan wrote:

Why did you say DPDT? Wouldn't an SPST or SPDT be enough. He didn't say it was a 240 volt circuit, did he?
He could also use a relay with a 24 vac coil along with a 24 volt transformer,which might make for a less complicated wiring job to his control switch.
Jeff
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Even if it was 220V, he could still use a regular SPST switch. Same principle, when its off it breaks the circuit.
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Just in case, that's all. I figured if he was going to make a trip to the supply house he might as well get a DPDT in case there was something else he wanted to switch at the same time. They cost pretty much the same.

Yep, that's a good idea. That way he can run smaller gauge (and much cheaper) cable to the pump, and it's much safer too.
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Turn the breaker off.
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X10 Appliance module and a remote wireless switch. Most hardware stores sell some sort of switch and module under a few other brands. These are particularly popular for christmas lights but should be available year round. Check walmart

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An X10 Appliance module will not handle a 1 1/2 HP motor.
Make sure the relay can handle the spec'ed HP of the motor. A problem with relays, especially if they are abused is the contacts will weld themselves closed.

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On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 19:13:54 -0700, Bob F wrote:

Another problem is when switches use low current they can build up contamination because there is not enough curernt to keep the switch clean. So be sure to use a switch rated for the voltage you intend to use.
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Very happy to see that posting. Completely agree adding the wording 'low or zero current'! And 'sealed' switches/relays where you can't get at the contacts a problem. That's why low voltage switches and relays can sometimes be a pain to trouble shoot! Even though relay contacts and switches often designed to slightly wipe their contacts each time operated contact corrosion can occur, so that when switch is operated to make contact nothing happens! It was standard practice in he telecomm industry to provided 'contact wetting' , which consisted of a very small current (usually of the order of one thousandth of an amp) flowing in the 'Off' condition to prevent contact contamination which could occur in quite clean environments. Gave the term 'Dirty Contact' a whole new meaning! Wetting often not possible with low voltage control circuits. To the OP, a length of 2 wire (or 3 wire) #12 or #14 (Plus ground) run to a 15 amp switch somewhere near the exit door and interposed into the black live lead of the pump circuit would do it?
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On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 14:40:49 -0400, jack wrote:

i dont think grainger sells to the public.
Anyway, why not just use a 3-way switch!?
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dnoyeB wrote:

Hi, Maybe he likes relay for some reason.
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contactors are more reliable than relays and pretty cheap.
they have double make double break contacts..........
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Hi, Then look for sealed, mil-spec. one.
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On Fri 13 Jun 2008 08:02:40p, dnoyeB told us...

Maybe he'd rather run a low voltage line to the front door rather than a 120 volt line.
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jack wrote:

Hi, Wouldn't it be easiest to relocate the switch near the front door using proper size wire(cable)? That way it'll be most reliable. Relays can cause trouble some times.
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