What kind of plug is this?

Page 2 of 2  

Steve Barker wrote:

240 volt usually made for export or marine use. That is why I question if it might be a 50Hz machine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 31 Jan 2007 18:13:28 -0600, "Steve Barker"

It could be one made for sale in Europe, with a USA cord attached.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Doug, I sincerely hope you just pretending. But if you are serious about this stuff, you really should talk to your therapist as it has gone far beyond normal bounds.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, I am -- I'm serious about making sure people don't get hurt by following your advice.
Look, Wade, it's real simple: if you want me to stop pointing out to people that you're giving out incorrect and dangerous advice... stop doing it.
And spend a little time learning the difference between neutral and ground, huh?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's OK somebody asked, I guess because of the 240* volt rating if it was a washer/dryer combi; because in North America it is rare (never?) to see a 240 (230!) volt washer! Dryers, (with or without a working neutral), yes. Washers no. That plug reminds me of certain (230 volt) welder type plugs! Maybe that's what somebody used to safely install it on a North American 115/230 volt domestic supply. However beginning to suspect (type and model number not read?) that the machine is maybe 'European' /certain Caribbean countries etc. i.e. of a type used in parts of the world where 230 volt (probably 50 hertz) is the norm. Also remember that in some 230 volt countries there can be no neutral! Both sides of the two 230 volt wires into a building could be hot. This would occur, for example where the two wires are from two phases of a 230 volt supply. It was occasionally but rarely used here in North America. Haven't seen that arrangement for almost last 50 years! Anyway, all the more important that the machine be properly grounded. Also 'if there is a neutral' wire required to operate the machine (maybe not if the whole machine runs on 230 volts) that it be NOT CONNECTED to ground. * The 240 volt label also seems to suggest it is non-North American style machine? I must post separately sometime about what appeared to be a standard North American 115/230 volt cooking range/stove shipped from Australia that came into my possession. Australia is a 230 volt 50 Hertz two wire (one of them being AIUI a neutral), plus ground, country. It was modified with an auto-transformer to provide a sort of phantom/ floating neutral, internal only to the stove.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

It does NOT explicitly prohibit anything of the sort. It used to allow for neutral and ground to be bonded together inside the appliance just like he says, and still permits it for appliances installed in existing buildings with existing three wire receptacles.
ASSuming that the mfgr. of the appliance allows it, it would be perfectly acceptable to install a three wire cord set following the mfgrs. bonding instructions.
I agree that using the four wire cord set would be preferable, but a three wire cord set is NOT a Code violation AFAIK.
nate
--
replace "fly" with "com" to reply.
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You are correct in what you're saying for an electric clothes dryer, but the OP called it a washing machine and hasn't returned to amend that statement
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

*Three*times* the OP called it a washing machine. In two different posts.
Unlike Wade and Nate, I am assuming that the OP knows the difference.

--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jan 30, 7:33 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Wow. This is a heated discussion. Normally I would stay out of it, but some of the advice given was very unsafe so I feel compelled to post. Under no circumstances should the equipment ground be bonded to the neutral at the equipment. The ground and the ungrounded current carrying conductor (Neutral) are ONLY bonded at one place and that is at the main service entrance for residential service. The purpose of the bonding at the main service entrance is to limit the line to ground voltage to the intended voltage, in US residential thats Line to Neutral of 115VAC nominal. It is also to ensure that the potential difference between ground and neutral is 0 volts. Bonding the equipment ground and the neutral at the equipment will cause the current flow return to the panel to split between the ground and the neutral as it flows back to the service panel. The ground conductor is not intended to have current flow unless there is a ground fault and that current is only intended to open the overcurrent protection device. Bonding the neutral and the ground together at the equipment will in make the chassis and frame of the equipment part of the current return path. While this may not be noticible under normal conditions it could be catastrophic in the event of a problem. In the event the neutral and ground return path are interrupted, and it does happen, the neutral side at the equipment will float up to the line voltage supplied. This would cause the potential of the equipment case and chassis to be at 115VAC potential to ground. If an unsuspecting person were to touch the case and a grounded surface, say a water line, severe injury and/or a fatality would occur. Bottom line, please do not follow the advice of the poster that advised connecting the neutral and the ground together. If you are not 100% sure of what you are doing contact a licensed electrician. The work involved should take less then 1 hour. Saving $50.00 is not worth killing a loved one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The chassis of my BRAND NEW (june '06) dryer is connected (via a nice green wire) to the neutral lug the THREE WIRE cord hooks to. I only know this, because in the house we're renovating I installed a 4 wire plug ('cause everyone seems to think this is the new fad) and I changed the cord. YES I changed the cord myself. So, unless I'm misunderstanding what you are saying........
--
Steve Barker


"Eric9822" < snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Please post manufacturer and Model Number. I'd like to see the manual. Definately does not sound right to me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is the one previously mentioned. Mine is not this exact model, but close. I'm not where it is right now, so I can't quote exact model numbers.
here's the link to the manual http://www.whirlpool.com/assets/pdfs/product/ZUSECARE/8578899.pdf see page 7
and here is the text in particular explaining what I was trying to:
This dryer is manufactured ready to install with a 3-wire
electrical supply connection. The neutral ground wire is
permanently connected to the neutral conductor (white wire)
within the dryer. If the dryer is installed with a 4-wire electrical
supply connection, the neutral ground wire must be removed
from the external ground conductor screw (green screw), and
secured under the neutral terminal (center or white wire) of
the terminal block. When the neutral ground wire is secured
under the neutral terminal (center or white wire) of the
terminal block, the dryer cabinet is isolated from the neutral
conductor.
--
Steve Barker



"Eric9822" < snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Please see my previous post for general information. This in particular is acceptable per code for pre-1996 service installation provided:
Per NEC 250.140 1) The supply circuit is 120/240=Volt single phase 3 wire (Typical for a home) 2) The grounded conductor (Neutral) is not smaller than 10AWG copper or 8AWG Aluminum. 3) The grounded conductor (Neutral) is insulated, or the grounded (Neutral) is uninsulated and part of a Type SE service entrance cable and the branch circuit originates at the service panel. (This means if you have SE cable it cannot be fed off a subpanel) 4) Grounding contacts of receptacles furnished as part of the equipment are bonded to the equipment.
I apologize if I alarmed you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The neutral is not the "ungrounded " current carrying conductor.
This debate has gotten off track only because some are seeing the appliance as a washer and some as a dryer. If it were in fact an electric dryer, NEC allows you to connect the neutral and ground together at the machine and connect it to an "existing" properly installed three wire outlet
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You are correct. The neutral is not the ungrounded current carrying conductor, it is the grounded current carrying conductor. It was a typo and I thank you for clarifying it. The current code section 250.140 requires that clothes dryers be grounded in the manner specified by section 250.134 or section 250.138, a 4 wire circuit. There is an exception however that on an existing 3 wire circuit they can be grounded by bonding the ground and the neutral within the dryer. I was unaware of this since my background is primarily industrial and I have never run across this in my limited exposure to residential installations. The code was changed with the 1996 edition and new installations of this type of service are prohibited. It boggles my mind that it was ever allowed due to the safety implications I previously posted. If a new 4 wire dryer is to be installed on an existing 3 wire service then the 4 wire plug must be removed and replaced with a 3 wire plug and the neutral and ground should be bonded in the dryer (per NEC). Conversely if a 3 wire dryer is installed on a new 4 wire service then the 3 wire plug must be removed, a 4 wire plug installed, and the bonding jumper removed. Personally if I were going to install a dryer in my home and found a 3 wire service I would replace it with a 4 wire service first. I know there are people that would argue it's not necessary but that is how I feel. I am not aware of anywhere else in the code that it is permissable to bond the neutral and the ground downstream of the service entrance. It has now been made non-permissable and the NFPA has good reasons for changing the NEC. Next time I will make sure I do a little more due diligence prior to posting.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The exception applies to electric clothes dryers and electric cooking equipment such as a range. The exception has a history and I'm sure all here agree with your assessment of its dangers, as does the NEC, however in the real world, its awfully hard to convince a customer that something they've been using for years, with no apparent problems, is suddenly hazardous and needs to be replaced at a cost of $$$$
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.