What is turpentine used for??!

Page 2 of 2  
Toller wrote:

Mostly turpentine's historical uses have been replaced by other solvents. Chiefly turpentine is used for oil paints and heavy stains, and you can use it as a mild stripper.
But mainly people clean brushes with it, in my experience.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2004 17:50:42 GMT,

I guess the seller didn't read this:
http://pages.ebay.com/help/policies/hazardous-materials.html
You are not supposed to sell flammable liquids on ebay.
-Graham
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
G. Morgan wrote:

Ummm...where did he say he bought it on E-Bay???
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jun 2004 00:00:45 GMT,

heh! I've been in front of this computer for toooooo long! :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toller wrote:

I think it's still the thinner of choice for artists who do their work with oil paints.
Jeff
--

Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"If you can smile when things are going wrong, you've thought of someone
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

also!
I don't think I will be trying that, but thanks for the suggestion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I never used it with vinegar as a cleaner-- but have used boiled linseed & turps for a nice soft finish.
1st coat is 2 parts turps to 1 part linseed oil. Slop on & let sit until soaked in. [depending on wood & conditions it might be an hour, overnight or a couple days.]
Rub with a soft cloth and repeat with a coat of equal parts. Next coat is 2 parts BLO to 1 part turps. The following coats will be 3 parts Boiled linseed oil to 1 part turps. It will build up to a rubbed finish like tung oil. [and you'll be hooked on the smell]
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Please do not use this mixture on furniture. It will eventually turn to a dark goo which is very difficult to remove. It has a long history. It used to be used by conservators at Winterthur until they had to start repairing the damage it caused. It ended up being called the "Hershey finish" as it turned into a dark chocolate colored mess.
Good Luck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've seen it touted as a clean in many places. Were they using it as a cleaner or to restore the finish? I assume that when using it to clean, you remove as much as possible and you'd only use it every few years . Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You would be amazed at the misinformation that is available with respect to finishing, refinishing, and maintaining wood finishes. The conservators at Winterthur are not dummies and even they had problems. The mixture was being used about once a year in many cases as a cleaner. They wiped it down well and still had problems. It does smell nice and as you indicate, it is still touted by the misinformed as a cleaner so I'm sure it will continued to be used.
wrote in message news:2915$

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Toller writes:

You mean spirits of turpentine, not turpentine.
Simply another hydrocarbon distillate blend that happened to be available from ancient technology, before the days of petroleum refining.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I thought that many artists try to minimize the use of tur and use tur substitute to promote healthier studio environment. Although I do love the smell of tur. I didn't know VICKS uses tur. Maybe I should sniff it less.......... ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As it turns out, the oils of citrus fruits are very similar to turpentine. All of these are in a class of hydrocarbons called turpenes, which have a 2-ring structure and the formula C10H16. Apparently, they are resonably safe if ingested in very small quantities that can flavor things. But I doubt any of them are safe to drink a glassful of, and I have doubts about breathing concentrated vapors for several hours per week every week being perfectly safe.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don Klipstein writes:

Pinch a bit of citrus peel inside-out near your eye, or next to a flame, for a dramatic demo. Very toxic to insects; must have some defensive purpose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Volatile organic liquids in general will kill insects if you spray the insects. I have seen insects die in anywhere from a couple seconds to a minute or two after being sprayed with:
Gasoline Kerosene Petroleum ether Ethyl ether Ethyl alcohol Rubbing alcohol Acetone Paint thinner
Caution - All of these are either combustible or flammable, and mists of all of these are flammable. Citrus oils and turpentine will mar some plastics.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.