What is turpentine used for??!

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I bought a large lot at an auction today, and about a dozen cans of turpentine were included. Is there any use for it, other than as oil-paint brush cleaner?
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It's not a brush cleaner rather a solvent for thinning oil based finishes. Think paint thinner/mineral spirits.

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12 gallons, what a waste of money ,Find a wood refinisher or painter and unload it, maybe you could use it as exterior lamp oil.
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No, pints, not gallons. I bought 25 pint containers for $15. They were about $3 each retail. Okay, it wasn't the best buy in the world, but nothing to lose sleep over. There was boiled linseed oil, paste paint stripper, and mineral spirits in addition to the turpintine. I have always hated those gallon containers...
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Toiler wrote:

Linseed oil, and turpentine to a lesser degree, pose a hazard that not everyone is aware of. These naturally occurring oilss will cause auto ignition; which is often called spontaneous combustion; of rags, wood shavings, sawdust, and other cellulose, cotton, and similar waste that are contaminated with these oils. The decomposition of these oils is an exothermic reaction; gives of heat; that if confined so that the heat cannot dissipate will cause the ignition of the contaminated material. This hazard can be abated by storing such waste in metal containers with tight fitting lids thus depriving the reaction of oxygen and conducting away the heat or by hanging rags up so that the heat will readily dissipate. Materials that are contaminated with such wastes that will not be reused should be stored outdoors away from buildings in metal trash or waste cans. -- Master Fire Fighter / Rescuer Thomas D. Horne Takoma Park Volunteer Fire Department a cooperating agency of the Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Commission, Maryland
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No kidding. A neighbor just lost his entire 2,300 square ft addition to just such a cause. At least that is the best guess as it started in a small room they were using to keep their paints, varnishes etc in. Yes, I did say 2,300 sq ft. How anyone can call that an addition I don't know. The house was an old one built back in the 40s as I understand it. Probably planned to tear it down when the 'addition' was finished.
Harry K
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I store everything like that in the metal cans they come in. That is safe isn't it?! I leave rags opened up on the rim of the trashcan to let them evaporate. That is safe isn't it? Right now I have an entire trashcan full of shavings from 70 bf I just planed. It is pure wood, so that is not a problem, is it?
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Yes
Yes. Once cured the oil is harmless. It is the curing stage that generates a bit of heat. Under the right conditions, it will smolder until it gets enough oxygen to burn.

Yes. Just don't pour a pint of linseed oil on them. Ed
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Put rags outside in a metal bucket, wood shavings , well, grain dust explodes, if your rags drip on the dust its just a matter of time for 911
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Toller wrote:

practice to store such waste outdoors in metal cans away from the buildings.

Tom Horne
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Every Home Depot, Lowes, high school wood shop, woodworking shop, lumber yard, cabinet shop and many others have the sawdust in cloth or plastic bags at the bottom of the dust collector. In the building. Shavings in bags are in every pet shop, WalMart pet department, barn, stable, etc.
They present mo more of a hazard than any typical trash can full of assorted flammable materials. While I do condone good housekeeping, it is not necessary to take extra precautions above normal trash handling. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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Are you sure about the turpentine? It is not a curing oil like linseed oil. Turpentine is a volatile flammable liquid with a low flashpoint but I don't see that it will evolve heat as it dries. It does not react with oxygen to cure and leave a film or mass.

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FWIW, I've heard that about turpentine also. Don't know if there is any truth to it. Natural oils, as opposed to petroleum based products, as supposed to be the problem with spontaneous combustion. Of course, oily rags of any kind have been lumped into this. It may be more hearsay that fact on some of it. Not knowing for sure, I'd err on the side of caution. Ed
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Toller wrote:

Isn't that enough???
If not, it serves fairly well as a poison when ingested, a super duper eye irritant if applied directly and in sufficient quantities, and is also fairly flamable, if memory serves.
Quite the versatile chemical, eh?!
--
Ha'i D-suhlami
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It's more highly refined than mineral spirits. As a thinner for oil based primers- allows them to penetrate better.
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wrote:

Isn't turpentine made from pine trees where as mineral spirits are petroleum-based?
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This is Turtle.
Old time uses was to put it on a snake bite after you cut and bleed it and the turpentine will counter act the snake bite poison. You would put the turpentine on it and cover it with a oak leaf to keep the water from washing it off and put you leg or arm in a cool creek water for atleast a hour and this slows the blood down to let the turpentine catch up with the snake poison. Now days they have new fangle shots for this.
Also it make a real good weed and grass killer a long a fence line. It is the sap of a pine tree and sap will kill any grass it comes near. I would say it is the only natural biodegradiable weed killer there is. Just a little bit a long a fence line will kill everything there.
Now you can use it for paint brush cleaner too as you say.
TURTLE
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It would take a lot of snake bites for the OP to use 12 gallons!!
wrote:

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This is Turtle.
But he will never run out.
TURTLE
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Toller wrote in message ...

Turpentine is a superior solvent for paints and varnishes. It has a higher Hildebrand Solubility Parameter than mineral spirits or paint thinner and usually contains terpenes which contribute an "Aromatic" character (i.e. the organic chemistry term "Aromatic" , e.g. Xylene is an aromatic solvent, most paint thinners are aliphatic.) to the solvent.
Thus, it is more worth more than the cheap aliphatic solvents (mineral spirits etc) and it does a better job as a thinner for most paints and varnishes.
Regards Old Al
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