What is 0.411" OD coper pipe?!?!

As you may recall, I had a flexible copper pipe burst last winter. I mended it with silicon tape and cable ties. It held for 2 months, and then started leaking.
Today I cut the bad section out, but when I went to put a new piece in with my 3/8" compression couplers, they didn't fit the old pipe.
I went to HD and the guy told me there is no pipe that diameter. He thought the same freezing that burst it, expanded the rest of it. Maybe, but I am measuring 5" from either side of the burst, and they both measure a very round 0.411". I wouldn't expect ice to be so uniform.
So, what do I have, and how do I fix my pipe?
The propane hose I referred to in my earlier post will not fit this pipe; but HD had some 3/8ID reinforced vinyl hose that is a very snug fit. Is reinforced vinyl suitable for hot water? It says 225psi at 70 degrees, and I only have 40PSI to it.
Thanks. Yeh, this is beginning to sound like to troll to me too, but it really isn't.
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John Smith wrote:

....
If it didn't expand it, I have no idea. I suppose it could have been some metric-size non-US standard size, but tubing is sized by the OD dimension and despite the gauge (wall thickness) the outer diameter is the nominal size within a thou or two. What would be off by 0.411 - 0.375 = 0.036 I don't know.
Let's see...0.411 * 25.4 = 10.44 mm -- is there something nominal 10 mm, perhaps in metric tubing sizes? I can't seem to find any data in a real quick look-through what I have at hand...
I think I'd look at the end fittings on the existing piece and see what they are and simply replace the whole run as a first shot...
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I will measure at the T. If it really is 3/8" then replacing the whole run is probably best. I don't think I can replace the T though (insufficient room to work in) so if it is really 0.411... Thanks
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John Smith wrote:

....
Is this simply a plumbed run? Are you in the US I gather? If so, it's hard to imagine something not Imperial measure.
I did find a British standard that does show a 10 mm nominal but it would seem most unusual unless were a piece of equipment that used metric fittings or you are in an area where that would be the norm--but in that case wouldn't seem like you'd have a problem w/ the fittings...
Re your other question as a temporary patch, depending on what the use is--oh, I gather it is a hot water line altho it would be quite small for that.
You should be able to get buy until cold weather by using a piece of tubing and screw clamps as a patch while you find what it is you need.
I don't suppose the odd sizes come because it's a trailer or manufactured house, by any chance????
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Yes, it is US. It goes to my dishwasher. The contractor ignored code on several electrical things but I can't imagine why or how he used irregular pipe. I have been to two stores, but will try a real plumbing supply shop tomorrow; though I am not optimistic.

I drain it in October. It didn't drain properly because there is a low spot in the run. I guess it normally blows out with compressed air, but not last year.

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John Smith wrote:

http://www.copper.org/applications/plumbing/techref/cth/tables/cthindex_table.htm Looks oddball...
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John Smith wrote:

Apologies for what might seem to be an insulting question, but what are you measuring the diameter with and is there any possibility you are either reading it wrong or it is out of calibration? (Not likely if the 3/8" compression couplings you got won't go over it, huh?)
If not, then why not just bore out one end of a couple of thick wall sweat couplings to suit that .411 OD and sweat in a length of 3/8" tubing using them?
I'd be happy to bore a pair for you gratis, email me if you're interested.
HTH,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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It didn't fit my 3/8" couplings, or the ones at HD.

There is no room in there to sweat, but if you don't mind having your fittings glued in place, I might take you up on your generous offer. Tomorrow I will try the plumbing shop that is supposed to have everything. If they don't...
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John Smith wrote:

7/16" ??
I would check my equipment calibration and bring a piece of pipe with me if I could. And your sure its copper?
--
Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
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But your fixes are still as dumb as ever
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wrote Re Re: What is 0.411" OD coper pipe?!?!:

That wasn't very helpful.
--
To email me directly, remove CLUTTER.


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He was offered help months ago and still want so cheap out. He'll finally fix it right after he has a flood.
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wrote in message

Instead of being a jerk, give me a better fix.
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I did the first time you asked months ago. Being a lazy SOB, you chose to ignore it and go with half assed fixes that can flood your house out. Do as you please, but there are proven and safe ways to repair it.
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wrote in message

What was your suggestion months ago? It doesn't work because the pipe is oversized. If you don't have anything constructive to say, shut up. Thanks.
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John
Get a 3/8" expanding tool (swaging tool). Hammer it into the tubing to expand it to the size of a 3/8" coupling. Then solder tobing into the expanded tubing. Some expanding tools use a clamp and lead screw driven expander, but they are pretty expensive. You may need a plumber for this one.
Stretch
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When water feezes it expands. *You'll have to start at a place that did not freeze and replace it from there on.

Why not? Thats _exactly_ what happens when copper pipes freeze. It's a cool thing to look at/measure, as long as it's not you pipes.

See above*

-zero
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Yes, we do recall. You're not fooling anybody with this "John Smith" stuff, Toller, we remember who asked the question.

As I recall, Toller, quite a few people told you then that it wouldn't hold, and said you should cut out the damaged section and replace it. You didn't want to listen. Guess you should have, huh?

That's because the freezing water expanded the old *tube*. Not "pipe".

Yep.
Why not? I would.

You have 3/8" OD *tubing* that's been expanded about 10% by freezing water. Just by the way... do you happen to know how much water expands when it freezes? If you guessed "ten percent" then go to the head of the class.

You fix it the way you were told the first time you asked this question: by cutting out the damaged section (which obviously is a lot longer than you realize) and replacing it.
You may have to go all the way back to the beginning of the run -- where you will undoubtedly find a 3/8 compression coupling.

That eliminates *one* jackleg repair possibility...

You really *are* determined to do a half-assed job of this, aren't you, Toller?
If it *was* suitable for hot water, it would have a temperature and pressure rating indicating that.
Do it right the first time, and you won't have to keep coming back.
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