What ever happened to the WORDS used in phone numbers?

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When I was young, phone numbers has a WORD at the beginning. If you're over 60, you'll probably remember this:
For example:
Hilltop5-5555 = hi5-5555 which is 445-5555 Spring2-5555 = sp2-5555 which is 772-5555 Worth8-5555 = wo8-5555 which is 968-5555 Orchid3-5555 = or3-5555 which is 673-5555 Victory1-5555 = vi1-5555 which is 841-5555 Tiger4-5555 = ti4-5555 which is 844-5555
These seemed to make it easier to remember phone numbers, and the words were usually simple words that were easy to remember. The word was assigned by the phone company. It seems they stopped doing this around the mid 1960's. I wonder why they stopped?
Anyone know the reason?
Of course you can assign your own words. But no one will know what you're talking about unless they are at least 60 years old.
For example,
762----- can be SOund2 or POny2 or SOuth2 ROund2, POlice2 etc..... 536----- can be LEmon6 or JElly6 or KEndra6 .... and so on....
If your number is 536-1234 Just tell your friends to call LEmon6-1234.
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On Mon, 01 Jun 2015 01:45:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I don't think we need the middle step, but maybe I'm smarter than the rest of them.

Especially in Chicago, where the exchanges were MIdway, HYde Park maybe, and a couple others I forget that related to the neighborhood.

I'm guessing because some pairs of numbers had no good words to go with them, and they didn't think we could handle it to have a mix of words and numbers. As the head of AT&T said, "You can't handle it!"

My exchange is WAllabee-2. I really should try that. But I need to meet someone who doesn't know my number. .... I got a call today from a guy I haven't talked to since his wedding, 31 years ago. He got my number from WhitePages.com . We talked for an hour.
He had been looking in Facebook, but I'm not there under my real name. He's there but only under his first and middle names, so why he thought I'd be there, I don't know.

I have to tell you about when my mother moved to western Pa. in 1945, from Indianapolis. While NYC and probably some other places had dial phones already, we didn't. So my mother would tell the operator, OLiver 4-1383 please, or Oliver 4-3343 please,and after a couple days or weeks, the operator told her, You don't have to say Oliver 4, Ma'am. They're all Oliver 4.
I remember when I came home and they had installed dials. They changed the phone in my parents' bedroom entirely, but the wall phone in the idtchen they took the top off, connected a couple wires, and attached a top with a dial.
One time I called my best friend and I heard click click, click click click. I hung up and our phone rang. He had been calling me. The phone didn't ring at his end when I called.
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wrote:

When I was REAL young, my parents phone was on a "party line". Sometimes I'd pick up the phone, and the other party would be talking. I still dont understand how that worked. I assume the other party had a different phone number. My guess is that they ran two phone numbers thru the same wires to save on wires. My parents were glad when they got rid of the party line, but I think they had to pay a little more.
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On Mon, 01 Jun 2015 02:36:30 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Yes, somehow they would have a different ring, I think. You were supposed to only answer your own ring.
When we moved back to Indy and my mother signed up for the phone, the customer service person said she could get a party line with no other party on it, so she'd save money with no inconvenience. I'm sure we were not the only ones who got that.. And I think we had that for the whole 8 years we were there. But maybe we had to change to a private line eventually and she didnt' mention it.

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wrote:

That is what the yellow and green were in the old 3 wire JK cable. It is selective ringing. One party was on the red/green, one on the red/ yellow.
They stopped using the names for phone numbers about the time they started using area codes. It doesn't make much sense to say 301 LOgan 7 9322 (my phone number from 1954-65)
Some time in the 80s, they also stopped using unique numbers for area codes
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On Mon, 01 Jun 2015 11:57:08 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

When I first learned the two wires to the phone were called the tip and the ring, I assumed the ring was coming in on the ring, as in your example just above, the green or the yellow. Is there any truth to that? Is that related to the name ring?
Because when I was 60 y.o. I finally realized the ring was the second conductor on a phone plug, behind the tip. I know that's valid nomenclature, but it doesn't prove ring wasn't also used for the wire the ring came in on. ????

??? What would non-unique numbers be?
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wrote:

different voltage/frequency impresson across the line that the "network" inside the phone decodes and sends to the ringer. The "hook" and "off-hook" signals are generated by resistance across the line.
On hook you should have about 48 volts DC. Taking a phone off-hook creates a DC signal path across the pair, which is detected as loop current back at the central office. This drops the voltage measured at the phone down to about 3 to 9 volts. An off-hook telephone typically draws about 15 to 20 milliamps of DC current to operate, at a DC resistance around 180 ohms. The remaining voltage drop occurs over the copper wire path and over the telephone company circuits. These circuits provide from 200 to 400 ohms of series resistance to protect from short circuits and decouple the audio signals.
To ring your telephone, the phone company momentarily applies a 90 VRMS, 20 Hz AC signal to the line. Even with a thousand ohms of line resistance, this can still hurt if you grab the wire when it rings!!!
The 3 volt DC "off hook" voltage carries the modulation of the voice signal - which on classic fhones consisted of the earpeice in series with the carbon button mic. (which changed resistance with sound vibrations)
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On 6/1/2015 1:01 PM, micky wrote:

I heard that tip and ring were refer to the plugs the operators used. Tip was the tip of the plug, and ring wss connected to the back of the 1/4 inch phono plug.
Nothing to do with phone ringers.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Mon, 01 Jun 2015 19:30:23 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Exactly.
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There were two types lines.
First the ancient one where a line was run from a telephone switchboard (us ually manned by women) out into the sticks. Everyone on that line could ta lk to each other (several at once until there were too many and the sound g ot very weak). Those had different rings. Ours was 2 long, 6 short. That was in the days of the handcrank phone. To talk to people not on that lin e you had to go through the operator who would manually plug your line into the line of the person you wanted.
Next was the "modern" dial phone. It was a party line but you should have only heard your ring. Only one call could be going at a time. I was on one of those for awhile but someone screwed up and connected me to a private l ine (at party line rates).
Harry K Harry K
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On 06/01/2015 02:36 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:
[snip]

It's not any problem to connect more than one phone in parallel, but I don't know how then can ring just one of the phones.
Apparently it is true that if too many people are listening, it gets hard to hear.

I'm not sure, but they could use a different ring frequency for each number, and filters on the poles.

I had a relative who had plenty of money, but refused to spend more than he had to. He refused to get a private phone line. I don't remember if he ever did.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
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On Mon, 01 Jun 2015 02:36:30 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

they just had different "rings". When your phone rang there was 3 long and 2 short rings if you were ring 32, and 1 long and 5 short if you were ring 15.
Your line number was the first part of your phone number - so you could be 415R32 or 416R32 - with the line number assigned to your local exchange. A local exhange in those days might have had 5 or 6 lines, with up to 20 or 30 or more customers on a single line. I think the line was split into several subs, or party lines so not everyone on a given exchange line was on the same party line. I remember my grandfather's farm was on a party line with 7 or 8 other farms on the concession - and was Ring32.
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On Mon, 01 Jun 2015 12:38:30 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

OT, but anyhow, South of Baltimore one finds Telegraph Road. It goes to Washington DC but it doesn't have that name everywhere. I don't know what it was called when Morse ?? or Bell ?? ran the first telegraph ?? or phone ?? line from Baltimore to Washington, but that's the path.
Now I'm confused because it's the phone line that's famous, I think. Or is it the first telegraph line to another city?
Also nearby is where the famous competition between the railroad engine and the horse was. I forget the details fo that too, but I know where the track is.
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People in the U.S. are no longer smart enough to know the first two letters of a given word spoken to them.
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
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On 6/1/2015 8:19 AM, CRNG wrote:

o and a number zero.
I have zero in one of my phone numbers. Every time someone uses letter o when they read it back, I correct them. Zero, not oh. Few actually understand.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On 06/01/2015 08:19 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:
[snip]

I had an electronics college course in 1980. We were using the debugger program that comes with CP/M (called DDT). There was a 'g' command to run a program. 'g' was followed by an address (g100 was common). There was no specific command to exit the program, instead you would go to address zero. That is, 'g0'. Several students would complain about that not working. They were entering 'go' instead of 'g0'.

I try to avoid saying 'o' (the letter) in phone "numbers". For example, the area code 903 (nine-zero-three, NOT nine-owe-three).

http://notstupid.us/
"Trying to find God is a good deal like looking for money one has lost in a dream." [Lemuel K. Washburn, _Is The Bible Worth Reading And Other Essays_]
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Not me. My phone number ends in 20 and I always say two oh.
But what gets me is that in the US in the science field, people slash their zeroes, but iiuc in Europe they slash their o's. What kind of a stupid system are those? Wh'at's the point of having a system if the two parts contradict each other?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slashed_zero seems to contradict me. It says " Slashed 'O' IBM (and a few other early mainframe makers) used a convention in which the letter O has a slash and the digit 0 does not. This is even more problematic for Danes, Faroese, and Norwegians because it means two of their letters—the O and slashed O (Ø)—are visually similar."
Am I wrong? It was never Europe, just IBM? And how can IBM and a few other early mainframe makers be so stupid as to do things backwards?

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I was there. In the 1960s we all programmed by filling out "coding sheets". You slashed zeros or ohs. You had to or you would not get what you wanted. I learned Ohs. Other places slashed zeros. It wasn't IBM making the rules.
There should have been follow through, the printers should have been modified to match what was coded. Too late now, but we still struggle with it in the computer field and even in RL.
--
Dan Espen

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When I was young ours was GArfield. But then they changed it to HAmilton. There must have been some reasoning behind the change.
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On 6/1/2015 12:08 PM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

tter) in phone "numbers". For example,

- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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