What does the water company charge you for?

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And then you run into the municipalities that use the water bill as a back door way of taxing the residents without having to get voter approval...
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Rick Blaine wrote:

Do not how that would work since water is usually/often provided by a public utility. However, water usage during 4-5 months when irrigation use is highly unlikely is used to determine the sewer bill.
The water is provided by a utility not the government. As such it is regulated by a state agency, but the state or the city do not get the money.
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In many communities, the municipality owns the water utility, and thus the water *is* provided by the government, and the city *does* get the money.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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In many communities in the US, the water department is a city or (less often) a county department. Any revenue generated by this department goes into the city coffers, just like local taxes and police ticket revenue.
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Not necessarily true. It many places like, for instance, NYC the funds are segregated into different accounts, although the "creative" types in governemnt keep on coming up with new ways that they can bill the Water Board accounts for services provided by the City.
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Peace,
BobJ

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My bill was $60 for one unit. I was charged $18 for one unit, turning the meter on was $28 via radio signal and the rest was various charges including sewer maintenance. Don't you love how the City pad the bill. Just moved into the house so we see what my real bill will be when I use more water.
$11 is so cheap!!
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Terry wrote:

for one person in cool weather.
Most cities have a minimum fee.
Then comes the cost of delivery. If close to a river or lake the cost can be very low. However, take Los Angeles which brings much of their water in from the center of the state. The city of Denver, has a tunnel under the continental divide bringing their Colorado River water in from 100 miles away. Their neighboring city of Aurora came late and the nearby water rights were gone. Their main supply is on the Arkansas river near Leadville. Their portion of the water flows to near the city of Pubelo and then is pumped north over 100 miles. Aurora rate is something over $4 a thousand gallons.
Las Vegas gets their water from the Colorado River, same as Denver but they just let it flow to Lake Mead so their cost is much lower than Denver.
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And the Colorado River and the Central California Project and...

More than one.

Not believed to be true.

"to" Lake Mead? Las Vegas is substantially higher than Lake Mead.

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Terry wrote:

Here in Winchester, Taxachusetts, a unit is a hundred cubic feet (ccf), costing us us around $3.25/ccf at our household usage level of about 10 ccf/month. (The rate escalates from $1.22/ccf to $4.94/ccf as usage increases from 0 to 45 plus ccf per quarterly billing period.)
But, we also pay an egregious "sewer charge" based on water consumption which ends up coming out to be about 10% MORE than what we pay for the water.
That's the result of our town being one of forty communities whose sewage had flowed into Boston Harbor for a couple of hundred years. When the gummint began cleaning up the harbor and installing new sewage treatment/disposal systems about 15 years ago, they started whacking those forty towns real good, and I presume that'll probably never stop in my lifetime.
Our town won't even allow you to install a second water meter for irrigation use only and waive the sewer charge on it. So, I don't treat our lawns to as much water as they really need, 'cause I get just too annoyed when the water bill arrives.<G>
The only way to beat that sewage charge is to drill a well.
Jeff
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And unfortunately in many incorporated areas, that is prohibited.
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Hi Jeff,
For outdoor water use, you might consider some sort of catchment system. When I lived in Toronto, the city was providing residents with rain barrels that could be hooked-up to drain spouts. I don't recall if they were free (most likely there was a nominal charge), but I obtained a couple and collected enough water to keep my gardens in pretty good shape throughout Toronto's hot summers (the lawn had to fend for itself).
With my current home, I built a good size pond with a plastic liner and it collects more than enough runoff to see me through the dry spells (not that there's any shortage of rain here in the Maritimes).
Cheers, Paul

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Luckily our otherwise overly regulated and bureaucratic town allows wells for irrigation as long as you satisfy some minimal setback requirements.
You are not supposed to use the water for anything but irrigation, but...
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On Sat, 20 Jan 2007 12:39:09 -0500, Jeff Wisnia

Water catchment and a cistern. In Massachussets, you get easily enough rainfall to not need a well.
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You are lucky -- are Taxachusetts charge is $4.19/hcf for water and $6.38/hcf for sewer (total of $10.57/hcf) if you use more than 20 hfc/quarter. And if you use more than 70 hcf/quarter you pay $5.03 for water and $7.66 for sewer (total of $12.69/hcf).
You see here in the land of Kennedy and Kerry, even water is "taxed" progressively.
In our town, you pay the sewer even when watering lawns. So, in the summer when we exceed 70 hcf/quarter, we are paying 1.7 cents per gallon.
In fact, I am seriously considering putting in a well (at least for non-drinking consumption) even though we live in a near-city suburb since I figure the payback will be less than 5 years.
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My usage was 6 units. Water $20.64 Water service charge $9.97 Sewage fee $9.36 Sewage service charge $12.10 Total $52.07
Sewage fees are for the use of the sewer system
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Louisville resident here. Three thousand gallons is used as the minimum billing amount. So even if water is not being used, but is an active account, 3,000 will be billed. We use it, as a 2-person household. We do the regular stuff, with daily showers, dishes, laundry for two, etc. We don't use the minimum in a two month period. So.... That water is $17. The sewer charge is $23. The drainage fee, charged by the sewer company and tacked onto the water bill is $3/month, or $6 for the billing period. So the cost of getting water, and using or not using 3,000 gallons of water, after taxes have been tacked on, is $52. That's easy enough to see that a thousand gallons of water is about $17. BTW, it's in an area of combined sewers, and the EPA is calling for that to be corrected. So no surprise that the bills are climbing.
David Starr wrote:

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My billing is quarterly.
Three months was 16,000 gallons The meter reading is thousands of gallons.894 to 910. $72.50 for the water $39.45 for sewer There is a minimum billing bit I'm not sure what that is.
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