What does the water company charge you for?

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My bill was 11$. It said my usage was 2 units. I know that is not gallons.
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Terry wrote:

Here in Calgary, Alberta, the unit is by cubic meter measure by water meter which transimits the reading via radio wave.
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If Terry only used 2 cubic meters in a billing period, I wouldn't want to sit near him on a bus.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

LOL! My family of four with 4 bathrooms use more or less 25 cubic meter on the average.
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The actual unit could vary with the billing agency. In my area a IIRC a "unit" is 100 cubic feet.
--
Make it as simple as possible, but no simpler.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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Have a look at your meter. The units will be listed there on the dial plate. Cubic ft, I believe is what you may find if you're in the US.
Your usage, barring the subject period being only a few days, was likely very low because prior bills were estimated and not based on actual meter readings, and the water usage over the prior months was lower than the estimate.
-- Todd H. http://toddh.net /
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Ours is in gallons. Can't imagine why they would measure water in cubic anything. Liquids are measured in gallons.
--
Steve Barker



"Todd H." < snipped-for-privacy@toddh.net> wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@ripco.com...
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On Fri, 19 Jan 2007 23:19:29 -0600, "Steve Barker"

Water is measured in units. One unit equals 100 cubic feet (hcf) 1 hcf equals 748 gallons
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Ours is measured in gallons.
--
Steve Barker



< snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net> wrote in message
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snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

Water is usually measured by volume such as cubic feet, cubic meters, gallons, liters etc. "units" are just an invention of suppliers. This reminds me of that sleezy life insurance company that is always advertising "you can get coverage for only $10/unit"
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But you are aware a gallon is simply a unit of volume though, right? Approximately equal to .1336 cubic feet?
Just ran down and checked my meter since this has all gotten interesting... my meter is a speedometer typer and reads in cubic feet.
My municipality's bill though doesn't indicate starting and ending readings though like electric and gas bills do, just dimensionless usage numbers. For 61 days, I used 21 somethings.
On the back of the bill, it explains "Water volume is billed in units of 100cubic feet (HCFT). One unit of HCFT equals seven hundred forty-eight (748)gallons of water."
Which matches what tnom very nicely said.
FWIW, we pay 2.57/unit for the water, plus 1.20/unit sewer maintenance, and 1.17/unit for sewer treatment.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://toddh.net /
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You need to get out a little more and expand your horizons. The quantity being measured has a great deal to do with the units of measure. For example, time can be measured in years, months, days, hours, minutes or seconds...
In the case of residential water, many water systems use "units". A common conversion for residential water units is 100 cubic feet or 748 gallons.
To the OP who was billed for 2 units (presumably in a month), that equates to 1498 gallons, or around 50 gallons a day. Pretty much the average per person usage in the US.
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Having lived within 300 miles my whole life, I guess I'm am in fact not familiar with other places water meters. Every place I've ever lived had read out directly in gallons.
--
Steve Barker


"Rick Blaine" < snipped-for-privacy@bother.com> wrote in message
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Same here. I don't understand why some nerd with a pocket protector would bother to create an arbitrary unit of measurement, other than to justify his job at the water authority.
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On Sat, 20 Jan 2007 15:33:03 GMT, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Lee County Utilities (Fl) uses a Badger (brand) meter and it measures gallons.
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JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Because a 'unit' is a much more useable measure for that much volume. Much easier to look at a bill and see "oh, I used 3 units this month instead of the usual 1' rather than seeing the volume in thousands of gallons.
Same reason some items are measured/sold by 'hundred weight' or 'tons' vice pounds.
Harry K
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I guess I'm not a big fan of dumbing things down for certain types of people.
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Not so much dumbing down, but ease of reading/billing. My home meter registers hundreds of gallons. Our meters at work read cubic feet. You need less space to print out in hundreds rather than individual cubic feet. Many items I buy are priced by the thousand, but most of these are items that cost pennies and bought in large quantities or we'd be into four to six decimal places.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

My meter reads down to the gallon. Charged by the thousand. However, there is a little pointed dial that turns about 20 times per gallon. Very handy if you are trying to verify a leak.
It has a little round flat antenna mounted on the metal cover. The meterreader reads the usage while driving by at 30 mph!
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wrote:

I think if this were designed for single family homes, it would be better to use an average of 30 units, for example. So one wouldn't have to cut or increase his usage by a whole third to see the number change.

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