Well pump pipe leaking into yard?

Hello all. I need some assistance. Last week we had a water softener and RO installed. Our water is very hard, so our pipes are not in the best shape. When the plumber put the well pump back on after about 6 hours, water started coming up in the yard about three inches above the ground like a little fountain. We had five inches of rain the week before. Also, the pipe to the pressure tank broke. The plumber ended up replacing the pressure tank, valves and fixed the under the house issues. My friend cam over and dug up the yard to find the leak in the yard. We dug down into gravel, which was surprising, but never found the pipe and the leak appeared to have stopped. Left the hole to watch the water to see if it continued to fill the hole. It didn't. Then last night my husband left the outside faucet on and the hose sprayer closed. Upon waking, I turned it off and went outside and the hole is full of water. So, I guess my question is: Is there a leak in my pipe that only responds to the water pressure, or is there a pressure valve built into the pipe from my well pump to the house that drains in the yard when the pressure gets too high?
Any help would be appreciated. Happy 4th of July!
Kelley
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Kellh wrote:

I would worry that the water was from the pipe and if it leaks one way, it may leak the other, allowing unsafe surface water to enter your drinking water.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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I haven't thought of that! Thanks.
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And the plumber would be pleased to have you let him know of any suspect problems on his work, before it gets any worse.
Give him a call and show him what you found.
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The plumber was here when all this happened, but at 10P when there was no leak visible he went home. At that point everything appeared fine. Any ideas on why there would be gravel in the area of the pipe? My friend is a builder and was puzzled.
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Then he wasn't there when all this happened. Tell him what you found out after he left.

If your lawn looked ok, I guess gravel is as good as anything. But I don't know much.

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Kellh wrote:

Answer to the first question actually asked is "almost certainly". If it is the supply line to the pressure tank and if there is a check valve upstream of the leak it would be isolated from pressure when the well pump isn't running. Having seen a geyser when the pump was running initially surely would indicate a sizable leak from somewhere. While I guess there is some outside possibllity the heavy rains could have some bearing on the problem/symptom, I suspect it is a red herring.
The comment regarding possible inleakage is real and potentially quite important. If the system were as I postulated above, not only would it be possible to get inleakage, it would be almost guaranteed as there would be some drawdown into the well when the pump shut off lowering pressure slightly.
As for the gravel, it isn't unheard of to backfill a trench, particularly if they ran the power in the same trench. I think you need to find the pipe, and kick the pump on and see the leak. The other comment regarding calling the plumber back is also not a bad idea even though it sounds as this is probably not actually directly related to what he did, if the system was so corroded it's quite possible there were pinhole leaks before that allowed pressure relief and w/ new tank and tight system it has now failed at the next weakest spot. If that's the case, it may be the only real solution will be to run a new line in its entirety.
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dpb wrote:

Agree. In the condition the pipes are in, I wouldn't even be looking for the leak, just cut off on both ends and lay new pipe. Maybe even new wiring so you don't have to worry about cutting the old when trenching for the new pipe. There is nothing to be gained by patching a run of old pipe - leaked once, it will leak again somewhere else.
Harry K
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Thank you very much! We will run new pipes and power. I really appreciate your input.
Kelley
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Thank you very much! We will run new pipes and power. I really appreciate your input.
Kelley
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Kellh wrote:

Could that be part of a septic system drain field?
-rev
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No, but it may be part of a french drain field in the front yard, if there is such a thing.
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