we bought a new house, and got a bad roof job about 3 months ago, what do we do?

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We just bought a house 5 months ago, and we knew it needed a new roof. We thought we did our homework finding a good roofing company, but we didn't. They finished the job about a month and a half ago, and the shingles look awful, and some have fallen off. We can tell by looking at our neighbors, that had theirs done a month before we did, that things are terribly wrong. We don't trust the roofer to make this good, and we don't know who to call to come and inspect it, and tell us just how bad it is. Who do we call?? There are other big things that need to be fixed in this house, and we ended on a bad note with our realtor...everyone says to ask them for names of companys/contractors for our needs, but we don't want to have to deal with her. We are about to get a divorce from all of the stress and fighting this and having our pool repaved has caused. We need direction!! We need someone we can trust to help us find honest good reliable contractors. Mainly, our immediate problem, do we call another roofing company? Will they come out, and find problems, so that we have to poor more money into it? Or should we call a home inspector? And how do we go about trying to make the roof company fix it? Or should we even trust them to do that? The guy we hired was pretty shifty, and the roof workers kept showing up to collect their money, even though we paid for it all with a cashiers check 2 days after it was finished. What do we do? we paid 10,500.00 for this, we can't afford just to lose it...please, please help
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Did your or your roofer pull a city permit for the job?
If a license is required in your state for roofers, does your roofer have one?
If "yes" contact the city building and planning dept and ask for their advice, and the contact the roofer.
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On 2/2/2016 7:44 PM, Leslie wrote:

First, resolve that no matter the outcome you will end up losing some money. Did the roofer get a permit? Did the nspector come out and look at it? If so, you may be able to get some written evidence that the job is bad.
You can get a lawyer, but that will also be costly.
I'd contact another roofer and see if it can be fixed. If so, you can then go to small claims court.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

1. This may be a troll 2. I suspect the roofing supplier also did not get paid for the material since workers are coming to collect their money. Better check the lien against the house from supplier.
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3. This was posted years ago, and is just another re-post. Considering the user name, I suspect this....
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On Tue, 02 Feb 2016 23:30:34 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

I thought the same thing when i first read it, and later too, but decided to answer anyhow.

If the homeowner didn't sign for the materials, I dont' think they can get a lien. Of course he might have.

Darn. How is one who doesn't use google supposed to know this?

i never look at that stuff. Of course you're also saying, I think, that this was a real post years ago, not a troll then.
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On 02/02/2016 08:55 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

<snip>

Of course it's a troll, even if the contractor was so bad that they did not nail down half the shingles, their weight is sufficient (along with the overlap) that they would not just start falling off a few days after they were put up.
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On Wednesday, February 3, 2016 at 7:10:11 AM UTC-5, philo wrote:

Probably so. But in case anyone else comes across this in the future and has a similar problem, I'd suggest contacting the shingle manufacturer. They offer warranties, provided they are installed correctly. The problem most likely isn't the material, but they have field reps they will come take a look on a claim. I'd be there, go up with the rep, take pics, document everything, get a written claim denial in writing explaining what the real problem is, etc.
Also a sign that it's likely a troll is that there is no mention of the roofer being called back. You would think that some initial problem would surface, they'd be called, etc, ie there would be more of a progression than it's 3 months later and the shingles are falling off. Never heard of a shingle job where that happened, not without high wind, etc.
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On 02/03/2016 07:31 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I had a new roof put on 25 years ago that went over the existing shingles. The new roof did not lie 100% flat. The roofer told me that because the original shingles did not lie flat the new roof would not either, but would eventually settle in.
That never happened, they are still a bit uneven and doggone it the roof is 100% leak-proof.
Problem is, my home insurer closed operations in my state and I had to find a different carrier. Most of them...right off the bat...took a look at the roof and said they would not insure me. It did not matter that there were no leaks.
I will never do business with State Farm ...ever..because the agent insulated me as well. I was refused due to "lack of pride of ownership" or something like that.
The next roof will require a "tear-off" as there are now two layers. Thing is, why replace a roof that doesn't leak?
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On Wednesday, February 3, 2016 at 9:26:12 AM UTC-5, philo wrote:

Two aspects to that.
1 - Being the roofing pro, he should have told you that he wouldn't do the job unless it was a tear-off.
2 - IMO, tear-off is well worth the extra cost. The older the house, the more true that is. With a tear-off you can see any rot, any bad plywood, etc.

Did he use down or just fiberglass?

Yeah, that's a bummer, when it's just an aesthetic thing. Harder to justify fixing it.
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On 02/03/2016 08:55 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Way too late, but he did go up into the attic prior to doing the job and inform me there was no rot. I had caught the small amount of leakage in time.
Back then I did not have much money, so even if presented with the wisdom of a tear-off, probably would still have not gone that route.
When I told him how broke I was he held the bill for six months and added no interest. I doubt if anything like that would happen today.
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philo wrote:

on top of each other. Any roofing job includes tear off. What kind of people would do roofing without tear off? To save money? Our roof is metal ceramic coated tiles. Nothing to do with roof in my life time. Wind proof, fire proof.

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On 02/03/2016 09:44 AM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Per code: One (and only one) roof may be installed over another, so unless the wood has rotted a tear-off is not usually done here in Milwaukee
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On Wednesday, February 3, 2016 at 9:26:12 AM UTC-5, philo wrote:

I'm not surprised that most of them want the roof replaced. It costs them nothing (other than loss of your premium) to require a new roof. I'm sure that their actuaries have weighed the cost of a claim with a 25 year old roof vs. the loss of premium and determined that the risk is not worth the reward.
At 25 years, leaks or no leaks, you may be approaching (or have surpassed) the manufacturer's warranty on the material, especially since it was installed over an existing roof. I obviously don't know the specifics or your situation, but "2nd roof" warranties can range from full to "minus X years" to none.
I have been been involved in 2 "age of roof" situations recently and it's not just the Ins Co's that want to know about the roof.
I refinanced a HELOC on my own home and had to provide documents showing the age of the roof (5 years in my case).
I am helping my Dad sell his house and the realtor asked about the roof. She said it looks really good, but wanted to know the age. She said that, depending on the lender, any roof over 10 years old could count as "points against" (in a sense) approving the loan.
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On 02/03/2016 09:08 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
<snip>

The shingles were rated for 25 years, so it's now "end of life". When I do get it replaced (tear-off aside) it's going to be a big job.
Since I have a new furnace that does not require a chimney, It would make sense to have the chimney removed. That's where the leak started originally.
The problem is, I still use the chimney for the water heater and will need to get it replaced with a chimney-less variety. The present water heater is six years old and is rated to last 12 years.
So...the roof will get replaced either if it starts leaking or else when the heater nears it's expected end of life.
Between the "tear-off", new water heater and chimney removal, I better be prepared to spend $15k. I will have to tell my wife, no vacations that year. Maybe I could break this up into several smaller jobs such as water heater one year. Chimney removal the next.
Of course in five years we are going to be damn rich from all the photographs I'm going to be selling :)
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On Wednesday, February 3, 2016 at 10:31:42 AM UTC-5, philo wrote:

...or when you can no longer get insurance.
...Snip...
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On 02/03/2016 11:13 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote: st" (in a sense) approving the loan.

Since I'm with a company that specializes in older houses, I should be able to get it for a while as I have been keeping up with the repairs.
New windows, new furnace, new wiring, new kitchen etc.
But yep, will need a new roof within the next few years.
As a home owner , whatever the roof will cost, will be only a small fraction of what I've saved by not paying rent to a landlord.
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On Wednesday, February 3, 2016 at 12:43:30 PM UTC-5, philo wrote:

Ah..but did you really "save" it or did you spend it on other things? ;-)
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On 02/03/2016 12:03 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

A little bit of each, when I was working I put the maximum amount allowable in my 401k. so counting my company's contribution and interest, though it is not huge fortune, at least I do have a bit of it saved.
All those years I scrimped and saved (and stayed put) while I watched my co-workers continually grow dissatisfied with the "bigger and better" houses they kept buying.
Since my actual savings account pays something like 0.02% interest, no real need to keep much money there other than enough to pay off my monthly bills.
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On Wednesday, February 3, 2016 at 1:12:57 PM UTC-5, philo wrote:

If the money for the roof and other repairs are still in the 401(k)/IRA, you might want to look at the tax advantages of taking a little bit out each year to limit your tax exposure. If you are near the top of a tax bracket each year you may pay more tax on that "lump sum" distribution if you take it out all in one year.
You can always reinvest it outside of the qualified account if you still want to try for some growth.
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