ways to heat up a house

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wrote:

Well, bozo, you never said that before.
In fact you said something contradictory and it is still up there: "I am always MUCH hotter in humid conditions than in dry even when the temperature is exactly the same."
"Always". "Hotter".
When you make up your mind how humid conditions make you feel, post back.
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Learn to read, moron. I said, "I find exactly the opposite. I am always MUCH hotter in humid summer conditions than in dry even when the temperature is exactly the same. The same holds true in the winter. On a dry day 15 degrees isn't so bad but on a wet/humid day it's torture. Adding moisture to the air is not something I would ever do to "feel warmer"." So...obviously "the same holds true in winter" means exactly what I said. On a dry, cold day it's tolerable, but a cold humid day is torture. Humidity intensifies the temperature. If it's hot, humidity makes it feel hotter. If it's cold, humidity makes it feel colder. Get it now? Geez.
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so where does this "magic reversal" occur? what is hot? and what is cold?
at 90F humidity makes things feel hotter? what about at 85? 80? 75? 70? 60? where does "cold" begin?
Your premise is simply not true.
People loose heat to the environment FASTER when the humidity is lower......independent of temperature.
google the following:
humidity vs temperature comfort
and read some of the info at the various links
Hold temperature constant....be it 55F, 60F or 65F, at one of these temperature levels vary the humidity level. For a fixed temperature, increased humidity slows heat loss from the body and thus increases the feeling of warmth. The effect over reasonable ranges of humidity is only 4 or 5 degrees but its still there.

by dry as a bone...you're meaning what humidity level? 5%? 10%
Try adding some moisture to the air, get the humidity up closer to 50%.......it'll be better for you & the furniture. cheers Bob
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You're an idiot...Having you house that humid would require dumping GALLONS of water into the air constantly and you would be growing mold and mildew everywhere..The windows would have water running down them...Some walls as well....Your advice is not only stupid but dangerous as well....
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Yeah, well this guy thinks humid cold air feels warmer than dry cold air, so he's clearly not all there.
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Sorry I should have been more specific..I was refering to poster who was telling him to cover his stove with pots of boiling water and filling the tub or running the shower ...Not aimed at you...
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wrote:

TOO low, it feels cold. 35% is about minimum for comfort - but in cold weather too much higher causes condensation problems on cold surfaces like windows/
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wrote:

You're a dumbbell.

No, it woudln't. Less than a gallon per day, which takes about 4 hours, is plenty. A half gallon is enough to feel much warmer, but I have used more to be sure I would be comfortable when I got up the next morening. I havent' done this for more than two days in a row, but I asked the OP how long he was trying to stay warm. I don't think he's answered that.

When he has water running down the windows or walls, he should stop. I've never had that. Have you? I think you believe you will, but it's on faith. I've had a little bit of condensation on cold windows, but I get that when the furnace is running too, probably especially when the humidifier is running.

You seem to think your experience applies everywhere at all times.
You seem to hold these beliefs about humidity with the same strength others hold religious beliefs. I wonder why.
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Does the furnace cut off before the thermostat setting is reached? If so, there is something wrong with the furnace. Weren't you the one who posted a few weeks ago about the limit switch cutting off, and later found a problem with the blower? Thinking more though, if you have a mechanical thermostat as opposed to digital, the heat anticipator could be set wrong and cutting the furnace off too soon. Larry
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mm wrote:

Sounds like you don't have a humidifier where you need one in winter.
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wrote:

I have one in the furnace, but that doesn't work when the furnace isn't working. His furnace runs some, but we don't know if it has a humidifier or not.
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mm wrote:

Indeed, humidifier runs when blower is on. If I need to raise humidity without heat, I just run the blower only.
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I live in Memphis, TN and trying to get the [18 year old] house to 72 deg F. The electricity is 110 VAC 60Hz. I mistyped. Often, the furnace is referred to as York P2MP 5 [gas] burner model. There is a humidifier upstairs, but I don't know if it needs to be fed water or nor. There is a slot on the Johnson Control board for a humidifier, but the Aprilaire humidifier is not connected to that.
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the internal impedance of the motor would be twice as high, so doing this does not run the fan faster.
BTW, does anyone know if the there are squirel cage motors with bigger blades? If not, would installing a small fan inside make a difference?
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On Sun, 10 Jan 2010 18:02:47 -0800 (PST), Deodiaus

That doesn't right to me. The resistance of the windings won't change and the inductive impedance, also in ohms is dependant on the frequency of the current, which isn't going to change.
That is not to say I think running the fan faster will help much or help at all. There is only so much heat made by the fire, and if you blow the air over the hot heat exchanger faster, it seems to me the air won't absorb as much heat as if it passed by more slowly.
Let's imagine the opposite. If the air absorbed just as much heat per volume of air, and the fan ran faster, so there was more air going by, the heat exchanger would lose so much heat it wouldn't be as hot as it once was. So, it wouldn't have enough heat to warm the air.
I'll admit that when I turn the fan higher in my car, it does make me warm up more quickly, but I think the difference is that my car has adquate heat and for some reason, your furnace doesn't. It's not running enough it seems.
BTW, you said you are running it on 110 volts 50 cycle. Where are you that you have 50 cycle current?
If you call someone out and say you are considering installing a new furnace, he will undoubtedly be wililng to have his company sell you one. But I would not tell him that. I'd ask what is wrong with the furnadce now, and how much it is to fix it. YOu're all ove rthe map here with the fan, the size of the furnace, the limit switches. I don't think this thread is anywhere near figuring out whawt your problem is. You don't know the BTU rating of your furnace for example. You didnt' even say if it was oil or gas! Or if you have a good flame.
If it's oil, a lot of people have them cleaned them every year. Once in two years is certainly not wasteful. Ask someone to come out and look at your furnace while he's cleaning it.

Inside where? No.
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A 110 volt motor run on 220 VAC won't run for very long. Couple nanoseconds?
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Jan 11, 7:48am, "Stormin Mormon"

I guess so that they can sell the same model in both Europe and America.
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Deodiaus wrote:

But you probably re-wire the connections to it to use it on 220VAC.
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I'd guess there is a wire to move, under the cover plate. To make it 220 VAC.
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On Mon, 11 Jan 2010 17:51:01 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Of course FTR this means what I said about the resistance and impedance not changing isn't likely true, if another winding is added to the circuit or if the wires are rearranged.
But I think by now everyone has said it won't help to change the voltage.
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