Water valves - why multiturn?

Hi,
I'm talking about valves that you find in various places in your home's water supply system. It seems to me that a quarter-turn valve with a biggish (typically red) lever is most convenient type to use. It gives you good leverage it doesn't look like it's going to break off. I have had bad luck with multi-turn valves. Sometimes they are invonvenient to use if they are hard to reach. the handles have broken on a number of occasions and two main ones - the ones that control the water coming in - do not shut the water off completely. So when replacing all of these, I was planning on using the quarter-turn-big-lever types. So I am wondering if my choice is sound and whether I am missing something.
Thank you in advance,
Aaron
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yeah ball valves are way better, they appear to last forever and never leak.
they cost more new, which may be why there not the standard.......
in my home all valves changes, replacements or alterations get ball valves ONLY.
there are only a few old style valves remaining
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Ball valves are better and easy to use but I just replaced one 7 yrs old that would not shut off completely, maybe when these were all US made they didnt leak, but nobody knows what they get these days.
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Only thing is if you close the water valve (1/4 turn)too fast it's liable to cause water hammer

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oh no! not that.
s

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Quarter-turn style is a BALL valve.
Multi-turn style is a GATE valve.
You were one step above "water-turny-offy-thingy," but now you know, and knowing is half the battle.
Ball valves are definitely the standard where all you need is on and off.
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could also be a globe valve now YOU are a step above a whatyoumaycallit!

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On Dec 18, 3:21�pm, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

you can throttle ball valves too, if your a little patient
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A gate valve is only one kind of multi-turn valves. Not suitable for throttleing. Full open or closed only. Globe valves are another. They are suitable for proportional opening needs.
http://www.valvedirectory.com/valve_glossary.html

I have had them leak, which another poster said doesn't happen.
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Gate valves are fully 'throttle'able also.
steve

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On Thu, 18 Dec 2008 19:05:32 -0600, "Steve Barker"

Using one that way can bite you. It's really not such a great idea.
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wrote:

Why not? In boiler school they teach you to do that under certain circumstances. Many (but not all) are designed just for that.
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why not cause over time running water will erode the gate then it wont shut off when needed
wrote:

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wrote:

The internals of a partially closed gate valve tend to erode over time. The outside of the valve may give no indication that the insides are completely missing. I personally have seen this happen, and cause a great expense to the owner.
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multi-turn doesn't necessarly mean gate valve.
steve

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Could also be angle valve, or globe valve....
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You are correct. the quarter turn ball valves are the way to go.
steve

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Ball valve: Work well where seldom used. Design makes them sort of clean themselves when they are opened or closed. Sometimes if one won't completely stop flow, turning off/on/off a couple times "fixes" the problem if it's not too worn. Turn harder. Can get pretty hard to turn if several years pass between uses. Wear faster; often designed metal ball to metal casting. Not meant for frequent use; will begin to leak and can not be repaired by changing parts. More susceptible to ionization/attachment of water impurities, esp some well waters. Wear out much faster there, esp for seasonal operations. .
Gate Valves (multi-turn): Are a gate that gets screwed in/out to close/open water flow. Can be most any material but usually the part that wears out when it won't stop water flow is a rubber washer. Wear is =/> ball valves, usually >. More prone to leaking at the stem, not completely stopping water flow in areas with a lot of solids in the water, when used seasonally. Dirt/sand in the water can wear the stopper quickly but it's easily replcaeable. Easily repairable: washers, stoppers, o-rings, etc. can all be replaced without removing the valve. Two pieces as a rule: Head with stem, stem oring or washer, and stopper washer. Case, which the gate slides into when the handle is turned. Less expensive that Ball Valves, often by a substantial amount; possibly $3 to $20 respectively, at least around here for plastic vs brass ball valve. 8$ brass gate to $20 brass ball IIRC at local hardware but not in the market, so ... numbers may be off a bit depending on your source/s.
HTH
Twayne
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or, uncommonly, put in two in a row, so when one fails in 25-35 years, the other will be in place.
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You might want to check your local codes. Where I am, the valves before and after the meter have to both be gate valves, and they have to meet a certain standard. The one between the street and meter has to be a "meter code" valve, which is a special gate valve with a non- rising stem. They aren't cheap, costing about $30 for the 3/4" size. I would suspect they would last for 50 years or more, and aren't available anywhere but a plumbing supply house.
YMMV,
JK
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