Water temp changed

After a new shower faucet was installed in the master bedroom, the second shower now has only hot water for a minute or two and then it is lukewarm.
The second shower is a Glacier Bay single handle shower.
The sink faucets in the second bathroom don't run out of hot water after a few minutes.
Can someone please help me.
Thanks, Andy
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On Wednesday, September 19, 2012 1:29:57 PM UTC-4, Andy wrote:

Is the second shower the one in the master bedroom where you just installed the new single handle unit? Or is the second shower a separate shower which went bad after you replaced the faucet in the master bedroom shower?
If it's the first case where the just replaced unit is bad, my guess would be that there's something defective in the single handle shower. Some spring or valve or sediment in the inner workings gets shifted after a minute or two of use and obstructs the flow of the hot water.
If it's the second case, maybe the replacement dislodged sediment in the pipes that found its way to the second shower handle. Paul
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On Wednesday, September 19, 2012 12:43:43 PM UTC-5, Pavel314 wrote:

Thanks.
The second shower went bad after the shower faucet was replaced in the master bedroom.
Second shower is a Glacier Bay Model 814-278 or 816-635.(Second number has shower only next to the number ??)
Part number for the ceramic cartridge is A507887.
If the cartridge needs replacing, I could not find the part.
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I'm no expert on shower faucets, but I know that because of a lot of law suits launched by people who have scalded themselves in showers, faucet manufacturers are putting flow limiting devices on the hot side of their shower and tub/shower faucets. The faucet will be factory set to allow only enough hot water through to make for a tepid shower, but you can change that factory setting to restore normality to the situation. Of course, by doing that you forfeit all your rights to sue the manufacturer should you scald yourself in the shower.
You might want to do a Google search for the original documentation that came with your faucet. (The "shower only" model of that faucet won't have a port on the bottom to allow for a tub spout.) Or, your local Home Depot store manager could probably find out where you can get that info. And, see if that flow limiting device is working properly according to the installation instructions.
Alternatively, it's very possible that the head from a brass washer screw or a little puddle of solidified solder broke off and is now interfering with the flow to the hot side of your shower valve. In that case, the fix would be to shut off the water to the shower valve (and you should always have isolating valves upstream of any plumbing you might need to repair), take the cartridge out, and hold a bucket in front of the valve while a helper turns the hot water back on to the faucet for a few seconds to clear anything in the hot supply pipe.
--
nestork


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Are the showers back-to-back in the same wall ?
If yes, you may have installed the cartridge in the new shower valve backwards...
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On Wed, 19 Sep 2012 10:29:56 -0700 (PDT), Andy

Is this an electric water heater? If it is, one of the heating elements may have burned out.
They are easy to test.
*** SHUT OFF THE POWER *** Disconnect one of the wires from the upper element. Put a multimeter across the two screws, with the meter set to the OHMS scale. If you get a reading, the element is good, if not, replace it. Do the same for the lower element.
Occasionally, the temperature control can also go bad. This dont happen often, but is possible. The way to test this is to set your meter to the AC scale, set to at least 250 volts (or higher). Measure the voltage across the two element screws when the heater is operating. So this on both elements.
You must do this with the power ON, so be sure you know what you're doing, and be safe.
If your heater is gas, I have no clue what your problem is....
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On Sep 21, 2:02pm, snipped-for-privacy@blankspace.com wrote:

He doesn't run out of hot water at the sink faucets in the second bathroom and apparently not at the new shower faucet in the MB, since he doesn't mention that being a problem. So, it isn't a WH problem.
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On 9/21/2012 2:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It might be for schizophrenic "home guy" who you just responded to...
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On Friday, September 21, 2012 1:31:58 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The hot water started working again in the second bathroom.
Maybe something small obstructing the ceramic cartridge broke loose.
I am thankful to God for how it turned out and all that I learned from the experience.
Thanks to everyone that responded.
Andy
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On Wed, 19 Sep 2012 10:29:56 -0700 (PDT), Andy

Not a problem.........

Fix it right and fix it the first time. Rip all the plumbing out of your home and replace everything. Begin at the water meter, or better yet, get the pipes replaced from the street into the house and throughout the entire house. This includes replacing the water heater, toilets, bathtubs, all faucets, all pipes, and all drain pipes too, including the sewer pipe that leads to the street. This is guaranteed to solve all plumbing problems.
Of course it might make more sense to just have your house demolished and build a complete new house. After all, that old shack you live in is pretty shabby and ugly. When I drove past it, I even thought "that's the ugliest house I've ever seen". It's an eyesore and lowers the value of your entire neighborhood. Your neighbors will be happy to see it gone, and for a mere $1,500,000 or more, you can be living in luxury. I know your wallet is loaded as well as your bank account and multiple credit cards. Quit being a cheap-ass. Spend your money and get a new house......
Be sure to donate 50% of all your money to your Church. The minister is hungry and living in poverty!
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