water stains in ceiling above 2nd floor (below attic)

Hello all,
We have a 2-story house in north georgia. There is an attic above the 2nd floor which houses the A/C units for the house. The house is about 9 years old.
Now, recently, there are increasing number of water marks in the middle of the 2nd floor ceiling (below the attic).
We haven't had any rain for the past 2-3 weeks and yet new stains keep appearing. Should I rule out an issue with the roof?
I'm not sure who to call - attic people, A/C people, roofer, handymen, etc.
Recently, we had an exterminator company seal up gaps in the fascia boards/ducts in the outside of the home because squirrels were getting in.
Pls advise. Serious replies pls!
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A lot of newer houses in AZ are built like that, with the AC units in the attic - not because it's more convenient, it's because the HOAs or the CCRs don't like to see roof-mounted units. (I'm trying to imagine the mess involved if an attic-mounted unit ever has to be replaced.) Each AC unit will typically have 2 drip pipes leading outside - one is the normal condensate drain, and one is connected to the overflow pan. In our installation, the normal condensate drain pipe runs down through the exterior wall and exits just above ground level - it is normal for this pipe to drip while the AC is operating. The overflow pan drain pipe exits at attic level - if we ever see any drips from this pipe, it's time to see what's going on in the attic. If the overflow pan drain gets plugged or starts leaking, you're gonna have problems.
If you're not able to get into the attic yourself to have a look, I would have an AC repairman check it out.
Jerry
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Shortly after my new HVAC was installed I noticed condensate coming out the aux drain. I went up into the attic to check it out and found the HVAC guy had left a set of nut drivers in a canvas pouch sitting in the pan next to the drain.
Jimmie
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Shortly after my new HVAC was installed I noticed condensate coming out the aux drain. I went up into the attic to check it out and found the HVAC guy had left a set of nut drivers in a canvas pouch sitting in the pan next to the drain.
Jimmie
Did you return them to the guy???????????????????????????????
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JIMMIE wrote:

(But seriously- having sorta been in the business in an earlier part of life, I know how much it sucks when you are a tradesman and leave a tool behind accidentally. When people do that here, I at least call, or if their office/yard is on one of my normal routes, I just bag it up and hang it on the door for their boss to find, with a note saying where it was left.)
-- aem sends...
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JerryM wrote:

We always install a safety shutoff float switch in the second pan. The evaporator drain pan is where we will put a slow release detergent pad that not only keeps the drain clear but contains a bactericide to kill those pesky microscopic critters. Ask your HVAC tech about setting it up for you.
TDD
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lora wrote:

To rephrase what others have said:
Condensate within the A/C unit is normal. It usually drains into the toilet's vent stack.
In the fullness of time, this condensate drain becomes clogged with algae and the condensate overflows into an emergency collection pan. This emergency pan usually drains to the outside where, when you see it dripping, you know something is amiss with the regular drain.
If the overflow pan continues to drain to the outside of the building (or wherever) it, too, will eventually get clogged with algae.
The condensate then has NOWHERE to go but overflows the emergency pan onto the ceiling.
The fix is simple - if you can gain access to the A/C evaporator unit.
1. Blow out the gunk that's clogging the overflow pan drain. 2. Blow out the crap that's clogging the primary drain. 3. Dump a cup of bleach down each drain to kill the remaining algae. 4. Install a water warning device like this: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber334
Thereafter, once a season, dump a cup of bleach in the evaporator coil area. I had to drill a 1/2" hole in the sheet metal to be able to do so (careful - don't drill a hole in the evaporator coils).
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What is "pls"?
--
Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Short for "plasenta." Trying to save bndwth.
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TYVM, which is a variation on Tyvek, used to vapor barrier houses.
HAGD! which is a Scottish dish made with potatos.
WYSIWYG, which is a hair piece that allows air to blow under, a whizzy wig.
Thanks for your translation. that's very helpful.
--
Christopher A. Young
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