Water pipe replacement question

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I have city water from a water meter at the sidewalk. A 3/4" metal buried pipe runs straight into the basement from the meter. It is maybe a 25 foot straight run from sidewalk to house. It tees off and goes around the house, feeding faucets at three corners. Maybe 150 feet total. Somewhere along the 150 feet run is a leak. Part of this is under a 20 foot cement slab, plus it goes under a sidewalk, terminates at a faucet coming up through a small cement slab.
I've dug up the faucets and water meter - no leaks. I had hoped those would be the likely places for a leak to occur, no luck.
The pipe is old - 40 years maybe more, the house was built in 1948, and the pipe has been there since city water was brought in a long long time ago. Old. Rusty. Unknown condition. And a nasty leak that I have not yet been able to find.
I can put a stick on the pipe and listen, and hear a hissing noise, but can't quite locate the leak. It hisses at all three faucets, the sound of the leak carries quite well through the entire length of pipe lol. I have not yet dug up the rest of the pipe. The pipe seems to be buried in rocks, gravel, and sand, and digging up this pipe is not a pleasant job.
So I can:
1) Dig up 150 feet of pipe, some of which is almost two feet deep, goes around corners, under a sidewalk, under a 20' slab, and hope I find the leak. Fix it. Hope this old pipe doesn't spring a leak somewhere else soon.
2) Replace the 25 foot run from meter to house and disconnect the loop that goes around the house that is leaking. The old pipe can just sit there and rot as far as I'm concerned, and I'll replace it with new pipe when I get around to it. I have a well for watering the yard, and don't need city water at outside faucets.
What is the life expectancy of water pipe buried underground? I am giving serious thought to option 2, because just replacing the 25' straight run to the house is a whole lot less work than digging up 150 feet of old pipe looking for a leak.
Comments, suggestion, advice?
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part you replace.
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I like that idea even better. Gives me new pipe from meter to house, and I can then find and fix the leak (or replace the old pipe) as I have time.
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is there a good reason to loop the pipe outdoors? better to run it indoors somehow..........
i would replace the main line, then loop the new line indoors. abandon the old outside loop completely.....
sounds like its galvanized, if it is, it probably bad everywhere.
yours is a excellent reason to use PEX, its cheap, lats near forever, isnt valuable as scrap, so theres zero reason for it to ever be stolen:)
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I won't use PEX because AFAIK (some please correct me if I'm wrong) the only way to make a connection is with a sharkbite, and those should *never* be used where you can't get to them for maintenance (like underground or behind walls). The seal is made with a rubber o- ring, and the rubber o-ring will deteriorate with time and will eventually leak. I already have a leak - I don't need plumbing that is virtually guaranteed to eventually leak more. In about 20 years or so all these new houses being build with pex and sharkbites are going to leak like sieves.
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Pex is joined with barb fittings, and round rings that crimp tight. There is a crimping tool that's sold or rented. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

I won't use PEX because AFAIK (some please correct me if I'm wrong) the only way to make a connection is with a sharkbite, and those should *never* be used where you can't get to them for maintenance (like underground or behind walls). The seal is made with a rubber o- ring, and the rubber o-ring will deteriorate with time and will eventually leak. I already have a leak - I don't need plumbing that is virtually guaranteed to eventually leak more. In about 20 years or so all these new houses being build with pex and sharkbites are going to leak like sieves.
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On May 27, 10:34pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Rather than saying that "pex *is* joined with barb fittings and round rings" you should say that "pex *can* be joined with barb fittings and round rings".
Pex can also be joined with Sharkbites.
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You're not my father.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote in message news:5ed79f76-3aab-4136-ba55-

Rather than saying that "pex *is* joined with barb fittings and round rings" you should say that "pex *can* be joined with barb fittings and round rings".
Pex can also be joined with Sharkbites.
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On Sun, 27 May 2012 21:12:22 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

and round rings". It can also be joined with duct tape, hose clamps, and RTV silicone -but it is not commonly done, or done with much success.
Sharkbites are GENERALLY only used to connect PEX to other pipe materials, or by DIYers.
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wrote:

Rather that say you won't use it, educate yourself. This stuff has been around for 50 years in Europe.
Other fittings are commonly used.
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But I'm thinking you are right, this old galvanized pipe should probably be replaced instead of fixed.
It's a straight shot from meter to house. But the only way to run outside faucets from city water is to tee form the straight line and run it around the house. You can't get from house to outside easily, house has concrete basement walls that extend a few feet above ground level.
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wrote:

meters are inside the house to keep them from freezing, and ALL outside faucets are fed through the concrete foundations
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On May 27, 9:18pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

going thru a concrete wall is not a problem at all. use a diamond core drill bit///// it just grinds the concrete or block wall to dust....
everyone up north has their water lines indoors/
as to PEX sharkbite isnt the only fittings, some just expand the pex that shrinks back around the fittings with a retainer ring.......
PEX is super easy to work with and cheap too
you can also use a hammer drill, or a hammer drill that acts like a jackhammer, its a bit messy but works too, supringsly fast.....
or just replace the main line and forget about the outdoor faucets
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 07:27:28 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

My main shut-off is like that, but it is hard to read a meter 4' down a hole.
Used to be, when I lived in Philly, all the meters were in the basement. When I moved to CT, same thing. Now they have transponders to the meter reader no longer has to look at the dials.
Gas meters were in the same place in the basement where the gas line came into the house.
In warm climates, it is common to have the meter outside in a shallow box.
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In VT, the meter was in the basement, with remote dials on the outside by the driveway. It would be trivial to change that to an RF device.

Gas meter was at the opposite end of the house, outside.

That's where the water meter is for this house (E. Alabama).
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 07:27:28 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

through brick - and need frost protection.
An outside mounted water meter here - even 4 feet down inside a box, wouldn't be a meter very long. As for the "rest of the world" - no, I guess you are not. You are in the part of the world that puts meters underground out at the street.
Where meters are inside, most now have either remote readouts or remote read capability
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On 5/27/2012 8:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

i've heard of very few, and seen even less places where the meter is inside.
--
Steve Barker
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On Mon, 28 May 2012 21:37:53 -0500, Steve Barker

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On 5/28/2012 9:51 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

been in 45 states. only seen an indoor meter in person once.
--
Steve Barker
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wrote:

Must be something to do with that white cane.
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