Washing Machine Motors

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Anyone have any links showing how washing machine motors work? I have a Kenmore that's perhaps 10 years old and the motor will sometimes run, sometimes just buzz. There is some kind of switch thingy attached to the wiring harness that looks sorta like a micro switch. There is a mechanism with two springs attached that I think has something to do with getting the motor started. I can't find a model number on the washer and the part number on the motor doesn't work on Sear's website.
I've searched but so far have not found any general descriptions of washer motors. The mechanism appears to be similar to my swimming pool pump motor which just need to be cleaned and lubed when it got stuck.
Thanks.
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For real help go to repairclinic.com They can answer questions, supply parts and prices are decent, shipping is fast. HTH
Joe
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Wow, repairclinic.com found my motor first try and it's cheaper than at Sears.
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Wait, I thought you couldn't find the model number of your washing machine, and that the motor part number didn't work on the Sears website. How'd you get a price from Sears?
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On Nov 26, 6:30 am, snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

searspartsdirect.com DID find the substiture motor model number by entering a model number for the motor. Trouble is it has several numbers on it and I finally picked the right one. I just went for two days with no internet and no phone service and I don't remember exactly how I got the right one but it may have been from the other link someone here gave me. Unfortunately the part number for the switch revealed nothing so far so I'm still searching for that.
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Ulysses wrote:

There should be a model right by where the controls are for the washer. It should say something like Kenmore 80 series or Kenmore 70 series
Once you have this just go to there web site and look up the washer.
I had this situation one time and the motor just buzzed. It turned out there was a sock stuck in the pump.
Chris
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I tried the 80 Series and that didn't go. I tried a number on the inside of the lid and no luck either. It must have a model number *somewhere* because I replaced the water-fill selenoid a few years ago.
Meanwhile I entered the model numbers from the motor and found one that worked. Lotsa $$$. I could probably get a new washer for just a few bucks more.
I was not absolutely sure it was the motor until this morning. There didn't appear to be an socks stuck in the water pump (yes, I checked) and the gearbox seems to be AOK and turns easily and smoothly with no apparent broken, worn, or otherwise damaged gears.
I'll try repairclinic.com. Thanks for that link!
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Next time the motor hums, smack it with a rubber or wooden mallet to see if it starts. If it has a capacitive-switch start, the switch could be bad.
About twice a year I have to jar the motor on my table saw to get it started.
I think I have an old motor from a Kenmore washer that should still work. It's pretty old, but it's just been sitting under my workbench for 10+ years (I think). If there are any numbers on the motor itself, send them along and I'll see if they match. Maybe we can work out a deal.
Before you ask, yes, I got caught by the old "sock in the pump" trick and thought the motor was shot.
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The motor I have is FSP C68PXDBZ-3290 and according to Sears and repairclinic.com it is part number 62556 which has been replaced by part number 389248. It has shafts extending from both ends of the motor as it is direct-drive--one shaft for the gearbox and the other for the pump.
I have an old motor from a Whirlpool that looks like it's exactly the same stator housing and and possibly the same rotor but has different wiring connections and the shaft only extends from one end as it was belt-driven.
I fiddled with the "capacitive-switch" and I have not yet concluded if it's the problem or if it's inside the motor. I have not yet ran the motor without the gearbox attached but I'm pretty sure it's not the gearbox. I have ran it without the pump attached so that eliminates the sock syndrome.
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I don't recall if mine was belt driven or not. I'll check tonight.
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Just checked the part number on my motor. It's not a match.
Damn! Now I gotta hang onto this thing for another 20 years!
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Heh. I have one old motor that I have not found a good use for yet and I may have another one soon. I do have a 30" fan blade from a whole-house fan that fits right on the shaft and I figured out which wires to use for slow and fast speed but I just can't figure out why I need a big fan that uses a lot of power ;-)
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Well, besides the washing machine motor, I still have the blower motor from my old furnace.
I keep promising myself that one of these days I'm going to build a sanding station but I never seem to get a Round Tuit.
http://myrtlewoodgallery.com/get_a_round_tuit.htm
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A Round Tuit! That's what I need! I'm gonna have to get me some of those.... maybe I can find some on Craig's List or eBay.
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From the language of your post, you're over your head here dude, call in a repair guy....how do you know the problem is the motor?
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The problem seems to be either the motor itself or the switch that is attached to the motor. If I detach the switch and push it while power is applied to the motor the motor runs just fine. It pulses and makes noise if the switch is not pushed in. It seems like there must be some kind of cam that the lever on the switch rides on but I can't see or feel one and the motor looks like it was designed to not be taken apart. I now have the gearbox detached from the motor and the problem is still the same so that kinda narrows it down. The lever on the switch does not appear to be worn but I'm not sure what it used to look like so it's likely it is worn judging from it's behaviour.
BTW I'm using Google cause my NG Server has not updated this group since 5/07! Gotta get a new server...
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Ulysses wrote:

The mechanism with two springs is a centrifugal switch. The motor has two sets of windings. One is energized when the motor starts. Once it's spinning fast enough to activate the centrifugal mechanism, it in turn activates the microswitch to energize the "run" windings. A common problem with these motors is the centrifugal mechanism getting clogged with lint. Clean out the dust and lint with compressed air to see if that fixes the motor.
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The "run" winding is permanently connected. The "start" switch connects the start winding untill the motor comes up to latching speed - then it disconnects. If the start switch does not make contact only the run winding is energized, and the poor motor does not know which way to turn and is incapable of producing any starting torque - so it just buzzes.
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On Nov 25, 10:21 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

yes, the start switch should be ON when the motor is stopped.. this connects the start winding... when you apply power, power flows through the start switch contacts to the start winding... when the motor starts spinning, some weights should move the start switch to OFF and disconnect the start winding.
without the start winding the motor will hum but will not start and will probably overheat in a short time... or you can start it by hand as a test....
with the start winding temporarily connected, the motor will start.
if you do not disconnect the start winding once the motor starts, it will overheat in a short time.
the start winding pulls a lot of power to get the motor started but is not designed to be on full time
(this is a simplifed explination leaving out the part about the phase offset)
Mark
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From what you are saying these problems could be caused by a bad switch or stuck centrifugal weights. It also sounds like I need to understand "phase offset" in order to really understand what's wrong here. I know a little about phases when applied to 240VAC and generators but my mind is a blank when it comes to 120VAC.
Meanwhile, back to my search for a switch....
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