washing machine drainage

I have a question about draining a washing machine below grade. Currently since my washing machine is on the opposite side of the basement as my sewer pipe (sewer outlet is in a small utility closet in finished portion of basement), it drains into an under sink utility pump by WaterAce (basically a sump pump in a plastic tub). This pump receives waste water form the kitchen sink upstairs above it, the washing machine, and a laundry sink (right next to the washing machine). Here's my problem/question.... There's a filter basket thingy right at the inlet (to stop solids from entering the pump basin). The washing machine water leaks out the access hatch that is used to access the filter basket. It seems like the filter does not allow the washing machine water through quick enough (only if the filter basket is completely empty is there no problem). Now I have a few questions......
1.) Is there something I can install inline to buffer the washing machine drain pressure?
2.) Do I need the basket thingy? Would anything the washing machine, kitchen sink, or laundry sink be large enough to clog the pump?
3.) I know some people will use a laundry tub to drain their washing machine into. How common/acceptable is this? Anything I should be careful for? Would this be the best (most commonly used) solution?
4.) As a work around, I've found that putting a weight (brick) on the access hatch creates a seal strong enough to prevent water leaking. This of course is fine, but looks odd. I think if a could find some sort of foam rubber sheet or the like to put between the plastic cover and pump base it would create a good seal (tough to explain). Basically what I want is to buy a sheet of may 1/4 - 1/2 inch foam rubber, any ideas?
I ask this because we're getting ready to put the house on the market and want to have things set up "best practice" (for what we have anyway). Thanks!!
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grodenhiATgmailDOTcom wrote:

Use the laundry tub as buffer. Best practice.
And install a lint trap screen on the washer outlet hose.
Jim
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grodenhiATgmailDOTcom wrote:

If the tub is large like a standard wash tub, empty the machine into than and let it drain into the pump.

One sock can raise hell with it. Keep the screen

Very common, done in probably millions of homes.
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or install a grinder pump, it will take anything not metal and chew it up, they are used for toilet that lift waste to higher levels
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On 29 May 2007 12:03:15 -0700, grodenhiATgmailDOTcom

In the past, my washing machines had a filter that I was supposed to take out and clean, maybe after every load.
The machine I've had for the last 24 years doesnt have this, and claims to chew up the lint to make it very small. I would rather have the previous kind of washer I think. I think when I did, less lint came out the hose.
So your question above could depend on the kind of washing machine you have.

Very/very
Best and most commonly used are not always the same.
I try very hard not to get lint down my sink drain, because I don't want to clog the check valve so that it doesn't shut, which I need to keep the sewer from backing up into my basement. However I think I clogged it years ago. It would only take a little bit to keep it from shutting. (and I don't know how to clean it.)
You don't have a check valve, I'm sure, but you have that pump.
I've never had a pump like yours and don't know anything about it.
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I think I'll try out draining to the sink instead. For a standard sized washing machine, how big would this sink have to be. We have a 20 gallon sink (http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn? action=productDetail&productId 137-332-102011&lpage=none), would this do? I'm also going to get a filter for the washer hose (the pump has a filter to protect it, but I also assume I don't want to clog the sink drain either). We have no sewage check valve that I know of (we don't have town sewage, we have a septic tank). Thanks for everyone's help/suggestions, you're making me feel a little better about this setup now.
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On 31 May 2007 09:22:22 -0700, grodenhiATgmailDOTcom

You need the size of a laundry sink, the kind found next to washing machines. A full washing machine will get fairly close to the top, and it will get closer if the drain isn't working well. (I wonder if it would overflow if it wasn't draining at all. I don't think so, but i"m not positive, and there may be a few washing machines bigger than mine. )
When I lived in Brooklyn, my 1930 building had a shallow sink on one side, for normal use, and a deep sink on the other. It wasn't for laundry becaue there was a laundry in the basement, complete with full-sheet gas dryers. So it must have been for soaking pots etc. It was big enough to take a full size washing machine's water, but I've never seen a sink that big since I left NY.

(http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId 137-332-102011&lpage=none) , would

I've never seen one of these, and it looks like it would work, but the fact that they call it a shower and bath utility tub convinces it totally that it won't work.
Laundry sink is a real word, and if they go to the trouble to coin the phrase "shower and bath utility tub", and don't mention the laundry, that's plenty of proof for me.

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On 31 May 2007 09:22:22 -0700, grodenhiATgmailDOTcom

(http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId 137-332-102011&lpage=none), would Well, I looked at this site for laundry sink and they hve one, but they are kind enough not to say how many gallons it holds. They give the dimensions but are kind enough not to give the dimensions for the one you have above.
I appreciate all their kindness.
FWIW, their laundry sink is 20 x 20 x 10. Mine is i think probably twice that big, and if so, even though they say that there's is "Perfect size to fit small laundry areas but deep enough to handle large loads", they must be crazy.
P&M
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