Washing lightbulbs

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With the old incandescent bulbs, washing lightbulbs was pretty simple. Just remove them from the fixture, then dip them in the sink and wash them. Wipe them dry with a dish towel, and replace them.
These new CF bulbs are different. Dipping them in water results in their base filling up with water. This is where their electronics are located, so once they are dipped in water, they are ruined, or at least require weeks or more to completely dry internally. On top of this, their swirlly glass top is much harder to clean. So far, it appears that the only way to clean them is to use Q-tips and spend a half hour to clean each bulb. This is time consuming and very annoying.
We wash our bulbs about twice a year. What used to take two or three hours, now takes two or three days. We're not impressed with these new bulbs. At least they could seal them so that water can not get inside when they are washed.
Has anyone found a better way to clean these CF bulbs?
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snipped-for-privacy@2012.com writes:

You're kidding right?
You're not supposed to eat off your light bulbs, screw them in, then leave them alone.
--
Dan Espen

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On 10/18/2012 2:11 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

Physicians have often had to remove light bulbs from places you can guess at. Maybe he had intentions other than using as a light bulb.
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You leave dust pile up everywhere for years? What a pig.
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writes:

Yes.
Washing CFLs periodically is a good idea especially if the CFL is in a dusty or dirty environment such as a wood shop, barn or in an open fixture outside. Dirt can easily drop the light output of a spiral CFL by 20-30 percent.
Here's how to clean the CFL without damaging the elecronics. - Take the CFL out of the socket and hold it base up. - Spray the spiral glass part with a spray cleaner (Windex works well). Let the cleaner work for a few seconds disolving the dirt. - Still holding the CFL base up, rinse the spiral glass part in clean water taking care that the water doesn't get into the plastic base. - Gently dry the spiral glass with a soft cloth or paper towel. Wipe off the plastic base and socket at the same time. - Lay the CFL down in a warm, dry area so the surfaces of the spiral that can't be reached with the drying cloth can air dry for a half hour or so. - Reinstall the CFL in the socket.
Tomsic
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You have to run the brand new bulbs thru a dishwasher cycle before the first use. If you don't then your attempts to wash them later, will fail.
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Don't say that, some folks may believe you. The Darwin principle will take care of them.
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Twice a year is too anal for me. Once in a while, a bulb may be wiped with a damp cloth if it is really dusty.
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wrote:

I sandblast mine.
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Mine go out for dry cleaning. They come back pressed, in a thin bag, and on coat hanger.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:

I sandblast mine.
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I coat them with WD-40 and the dust slides right off.
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wrote:

Dust accumulation reduces output - sometimes significantly.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca writes:

So, you wash all the bulbs in your house twice a year?
Here in New Jersey, we don't get that kind of dust accumulation. Not in one year, not even in five. I've got some bulbs in my attic fixtures that have been there over 35 years.
Just checked, a little dusty, but bright enough that I think I'll wait until they burn out.
--
Dan Espen

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Usually once, when I clean the fans.

I'm really not concerned if the attic fixtures get a little dusty.

Some people don't clean anything. <shrug>
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The only bulbs I have are in the fridge, and running for a long time.
I remember cleaning ceiling flame bulbs once. Made a clear difference.
Greg
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I have about 40 in the "old" house. All of them, with the exception of the four in the back porch fan, are at least five years old and all have been cleaned in the last couple of months. The "new" place has probably half that number (and half that again) CFLs. I haven't done anything to them, yet, including replace the CFLs for incandescents. ;-)

Clear bulbs clearly need cleaning. ;-)
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Have to send them out for dry cleanining. New expense, for people.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
With the old incandescent bulbs, washing lightbulbs was pretty simple. Just remove them from the fixture, then dip them in the sink and wash them. Wipe them dry with a dish towel, and replace them.
These new CF bulbs are different. Dipping them in water results in their base filling up with water. This is where their electronics are located, so once they are dipped in water, they are ruined, or at least require weeks or more to completely dry internally. On top of this, their swirlly glass top is much harder to clean. So far, it appears that the only way to clean them is to use Q-tips and spend a half hour to clean each bulb. This is time consuming and very annoying.
We wash our bulbs about twice a year. What used to take two or three hours, now takes two or three days. We're not impressed with these new bulbs. At least they could seal them so that water can not get inside when they are washed.
Has anyone found a better way to clean these CF bulbs?
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wrote in alt.home.repair:

Creates jobs. Good for the economy.
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On 10/18/2012 2:12 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Go to the Cessna Pilot Center at your local airport and get a can of prop wash.
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On Thu, 18 Oct 2012 12:35:39 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@2012.com wrote in
Why do they need cleaning? Are they in an unprotected location? Doesn't having them in a fixture keep them clean?
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