wanted: web site showing shower/bath valve replacement

Good morning everyone,
Been a 'lurker' here for a couple of months. Found some answers I needed especially regarding cement board for my bathroom remodeling project. I've torn out the walls/tile around my bath/shower, and 'Wonderboard' is now in place where wet sheetrock (spelling?) was at...except for the valve area. Since the wall is open, I want to change the valves (just purchased this slightly older home built in 1962 and the valves are old).
Just starting to do research on changing valves in my bath/shower area. Looking for a possible web site that shows how this can be done, etc. Preferably with pictures <grin> And of course, any input is appreciated.
TIA!
Andy S.
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Andy S wrote:

Go to local library. There are dozens of good DIY books out on basic plumbing jobs. Even HD has some. I think you will gain more good background than from a URL.
The job will no doubt involve soldering with a torch. Plan ahead how you will do that without burning the bath down...
Jim
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Thanks Jim. Yes, that's my next step is to get some reference books.
I don't think I won't need to do any soldering. The current valves are all threaded.
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On 12/7/2004 1:20 PM US(ET), Andy S took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

of the new valve, unless you are lucky enough to find a new valve that has the inlets in exactly the same place as the old valve. While you are at HD, pick up the DIY plumbing book. You may be encouraged to change some other things, or gain enough knowledge to start a new career. :-)
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Think twice before you replace. All new units will only deliver 2.5 gal per minute max. You may install a new fixture and be dis-appointed with the resulting water flow. For about the same cost as replacement you should be able to buy new stems, trim and handles for your old faucet.
It is generally easier to go back with the same style. If you have a two handled or single lever it is easier to stay with the same. That may not be the look you want. I just mentioned it.
Delta brand faucets come with detailed and pretty easy to understand instructions. I imagine most of the major brands do. The alteration of the connections will be where the challenge comes in. If the old one is not installed using unions, you may have to cut some pipe and add some. In 1962 construction most likely the faucet is connected to pipes with unions but the shower-head and spout are just threaded.
I'm sure we will here back from you. Have fun.
Colbyt
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