Wallpaper removal question

OK I used a steamer to remove the wallpaper. Looks like the next steps are sanding with 100 grit wallpaper, mud and then prime and paint.
The question I have is there are still some areas where the very back of the wallpaper (very thin white part) is still on the wall. It's basically seethrough since it's so thin but I would guess this is the part that the glue bonds is pasted to. Anyway do I need to rent the steamer again to remove these parts or will the sandpaper remove it all? And/or if any is left wouldn't the primer neutralize any of the glue anyway? Just wondering if it's worth the rental and time again.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

You shouldn't need a steamer to get the backer paper off. Just spray it with water and scrape it off. You are going to have to make sure you've washed off all the glue before you even think about putting primer on there. TSP is a good cleaner to use.
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I recently did a wallpaper removal project after getting a lot of information from people here. I also found a good link for how to do the removal: http://www.lowes.com/lkn?action=howTo&p=HomeDecor/removewallpaper I used DIF wallpaper remover with a garden sprayer and it worked great! The easiest part to remove was the layer you are talking about. Just mix a little DIF with water, spray it on, let it work, then it comes right off. The DIF product was really inexpensive.

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Spray with hot water from a spritz bottle. Let it set. Wipe off with rags or sponge that is rinsed frequently.
What you are down to is the glue. If you do not remove it, it will be visible when you paint. Let the hot water do ALL the work. Let it sit for about three minutes and wipe. Simple.
I did an 1800 sf house that had wallpaper on every wall, and on the ceiling in the kitchen. I know whereof I speak. Most people want to scrape it off. If you just have to do that, use a plastic scraper and scrape lightly. But when you are down to the finish line like you are, hot water, waiting, and them wiping does the final touch really well. At this time you don't WANT to be doing any scraping because you will see it when you paint. Use a light touch.
PS: Save your money on DIF. Hot water and waiting works just as well. IMHO.
Steve
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I've been trying really hot water but after it drys in a minute it's still there. Basically I've tryed the steamer once again tonight and it does pretty good, BUT, it gets to wall too hot and then the paper that cover the drywall comes off in little pieces sometimes. The wall is just a mess. Got all kinds of mudding to do.

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wrote:

Then wet it again & again. When it's ready it will come off.
Basically I've tryed the steamer once again tonight and it does

Then get rid of the steamer, A spray bottle or sponge will work fine.
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Grendel wrote:

I've put up and taken down lots of wallpaper, including two layers that had each been painted over. Never used chemicals or steamer. If the top layer of paper is gone, and the underlayer is remaining, you just need to wet it enough to soften the paste. I've never had trouble loosening wallpaper with plain water - the secret is getting it to the paste. For starters, I use coarse sandpaper, going horizontally and carefully, to score the surface of the paper enough that water will reach the paste. Spray with water, let it soak in, spray again and let it soak again about 20 min. Then start lifting it with a scraper, gently. Get as much as you can, and spray again. This should get the last of the paper. Let it rest overnight so's you don't saturate the paper covering on the wallboard. Wash it down with tepid water and a bit of household cleaner. You will know the paste is gone when it quits feeling slimey. It took me only once, going into the paper covering on the wallboard, to "get it right". Not rocket science, just messy. Put down newspaper and old towels to catch what runs down the wall. Scoring the surface of the wallpaper horizontally keeps the water where you want it, rather than running down the wall. Old windex bottle works great for me.
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I tried the hot water, and the hot water with dish detergent, routine and it did work, but the process seemed rather tedious. I had been avoiding using any store-bought products because so many people here said it was a waste of money. But then, just for kicks, I bought some DIF while I was in Home Depot. I bought it because on the bottle it talked about some kind of enzyme action that works on the paste. So, I figured the stuff was so cheap anyway, why not try it? Well, I gotta tell ya, it worked great! It was SO-O-O much easier than what I was doing before that I was amazed.
I think there are all kinds of glues and different circumstances with different wallpaper and different walls. I had different kinds of wallpaper on old fashioned plaster walls. The DIF worked like a charm. The stuff just floated off the walls with only the slightest amount of light scraping. It really did seem to be dissolving the glue somehow.
I don't work for DIF (whoever they are).
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