Wallpaper removal question

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Part of the wallpaper in my bathroom has started peeling. Thus this weekend i decided to tear some of it down to get the wall ready for paint. The wallpaper comes down easily but leaves a brown paper backing on the wall.
Is the brown paper backing part of the drywall called drywall paper? or does it need to be removed as well? What color is the drywall paper?
Thanks
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Not sure but it sounds like you tore off most of the drywall paper when you removed the wallpaper. Brand new, the paper itself is more white than brown in my mind. What you are seeing is probably the remnants of the drywall paper still clinging to the wall.
Hard to say without seeing it but I'm guessing that it is best to remove it if you are planning to paint. Using a sharp scraper to get under the edge and then try to get it off in big strips. After that you can use sand paper to remove what's left. I like to use an oil based primer on drywall with that kind of damage.
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wrote:

By "drywall paper", are you talking about what's part of the drywall when you buy it, or some second thing that might've been applied before the wallpaper?
If the former, and he removes it all, isn't he going to run into the gypsum? Can that be painted?
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It can be painted. A skim coat can be used if it is really rough. Oil base primer will help.
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In my case the wallpaper had brown backing. When was the hosue made? If you have plaster walls, then the brown backing is definately from the wallpaper, and needs to be removed. Anyone who puts wallpaper in a bathroom should be drawn and quartered.
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....and fed to hungry wolves.
The previous owners of this house left some extra wallpaper in the basement. The package says it's suitable for moist environments. Bullshit. The stuff's peeling 1/4 inch a week, and I have a monster bathroom fan that everyone uses.
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??? My bathrooms have ALWAYS had wallpaper and they've never peeled. We rarely run the exhaust fans when taking showers, either. I put wallpaper in my mother's bathroom 10 years ago, and it still looks great today, with no peeling. What's the big deal? I can't understand how anyone can put up with flat, painted walls. No pattern, no texture. Yuck.
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<h> wrote in message

impossible to change anything mounted on the wall, patch holes, change colors, etc. You want patterns, paint a mural or use stencils.
aem sends....
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Again ??? How does wallpaper versus paint affect anything mounted on the wall or patching holes? Paint is MUCH more of a hassle. With paint you have to fill the hole and then hope that your leftover paint is still good and still matches the wall color. With wallpaper you don't even have to fill the hole if you're lazy, you slap a small piece of wallpaper over the hole, use a razor to cut a small, irregular circle through both the new piece and what's on the wall, pull the cut out off the wall, and apply the new patch. Takes about 5 minutes, and it will always match. For changing colors, you just take down the old wallpaper and put up new, just like you'd have to paint to change colors. As far as a mural (euwwww) or stencils, if I stenciled an entire room it would take weeks, and look just like wallpaper if I did it right. Why on earth would I do that when I can put up wallpaper in one day? Also, I've never lived in a house built after 1900. Old houses are supposed to have wallpaper. They just look "wrong", flat, boring, and unfinished without it. Painted walls scream modern tract house. As always, however, YMMV.
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On Mar 27, 8:26 am, <h> wrote:

If you were the one that papered the room, and if you thought to keep a spare roll of the same pattern, that may be true. Ever try matching 20 year old wallpaper, on a house that had paper when you bought it? To make it look right, I'm gonna have to strip entire room (including pulling the vanity and WC for access), and either repaper, or skim- coat and paint, all to patch a hole where a duct was removed.
Seriously thinking of cheating and mounting a mirror over the spot.
Yeah, I have good reason to dislike wallpaper.
aem sends...
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paper, and with my current house, I was fortunate to find a closet full of wallpaper rolls which had been saved for at least 100 years. There was some for every paper on the walls, and a TON of rolls which were no longer in use. When I re-did the living room I found 6 layers of paper before I got to the plaster (how lazy do you have to be to paper over paper?), and I had a spare roll for each of those layers! I donated the stuff from the 1800s to the local historical society. There was enough of one of the papers for them to put it up in a hallway of their Victorian display house.
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<h> wrote in message

You bought your house from the most considerate seller in the entire history of the planet. :)
Donna
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Donna wrote:

basement the previous owner left when we bought this old house almost 20 years ago. Still there!
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says...

unpainted sheetrock) but I have the spare tile for the bathrooms, carpet (just installed), and bamboo for the halls/diningroom/kitchen that I'm planning on leaving when we move, hopefully in a couple of months. I also have paint, but some get sticky over such things. The last house had to be completely empty. The relo company was a real hard-ass about such things.
The thing I really appreciated from the previous owners of this house was a folder with all the manuals and warranty information for the appliances. They've come in very handy over the years.
--
Keith

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Oh man, that really helps. I was similarly fortunate when I purchased my current home. The seller was a realtor and she did an outstanding job with those documents including receipts for some earlier minor repairs plus extra paint, tiles and other assorted paraphernalia.
--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
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Malcolm Hoar wrote:

drawer, along with schematic for the sprinkler system.
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On Mar 26, 10:47 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The house was built in 97. Yes I did dry pull it. So i should be ripping out the brown paper as well?
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wrote:

Yes, you should be removing the brown paper.
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wrote:

I have stripped a wallpaper that was thick and had a brown paper backing. These were in kitchens and bathrooms where there was a surface coating of a water resistant type, and the backing is just for protection. I have stripped about two thousand sf of wallpaper. There are lots of it, some foil thin, and other as thick as posterboard.
It is difficult to tell without looking at this whether it is backing or drywall. Spray some plain water on it, and let it sit for about five minutes. Rub lightly or scrape lightly and see if the backing comes off down to the paper surface layer of the drywall.
Soaking and slow peeling and scraping are the secret to removing wallpaper. Use plain water, and allow it to set long enough to soften the layer you want to remove. Don't overwet, as you want it to soak in rather than run down. Use any old spray bottle. Use the plastic yellow scrapers that they sell cheap for drywall mud.
Good luck.
Steve
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Actually it's neither difficult or messy to remove wallpaper. Use a tool which scores the paper to allow the liquid to get behind the paper and attack the adhesive, and use a wall paper removal enzyme. Sherwin Williams and other places that sell wallpaper should have both -- the scoring tool is called "Paper Tiger" (one brand name) and you simply roll it around on the wall paper. Then spray the wall paper with the enzyme ("Dif" wallpaper remover from Zinnser is one brand), wait for a few minutes, and the paper should come right off.
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