Vinyl floor tile question(s)

Hi Folks:
I've never laid down vinyl tile but my lady friend has asked me to do this for her kitchen sometime in Jan/Feb.
She has old vinyl tile in her kitchen. Probobly will just lay down new vinyl tile rather than ceramic. Is there a decent web-site that shows how to do this?
Now for some questions after visiting home depot yesterday:
1. They have the self-sticking vinyl tile as well as the non-sticking vinyl which requires the tile paste. Which is the best tile to get? The self-sticking tile seems easier/cheaper to install but I have to wonder if using the paste along with the non-sticking tile will produce better results?
2. If going with the non-sticking tile, what is the best glue/adhesive to use?
3. Home depot rents out an electric tile remover for $48 per day. Does anyone have experience with these that can tell me if this is worth getting rather than using a hand-scraper to remove the tile?
thanks for any advice!!!
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DON'T buy self stick vinyl tiles!! They're total crap!!
Use the template method and cut out and install sheet vinyl. Make sure the existing floor is in good condition. If so, you don't need to remove it.
Go to a real flooring store vs. Home Crapo and they'll sell you the correct mastic for the sheet vinyl and subfloor.
On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 20:07:48 -0600, "Lets Play Two"

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<< lay down new vinyl tile rather than ceramic. Is there a decent web-site that shows how to do this? >>
Not worth the trouble. Instructions are on the side of the tile boxes. More detail in any DIY book. Check at your library, box store, look in old issues of "This Old House".
<< paste along with the non-sticking tile will produce better results? >>
Not likely. Just use stick on tiles.
<< Home depot rents out an electric tile remover for $48 per day. >>
You can use a heat gun if you have one or any common hair dryer. You still need a scraper, putty knife, and stuff like that. And time, lots of time. When you have the old tile off, the substrate will probably be a major mess. It is hard to predict what you will find and thus impossible to suggest best means of getting a smooth surface. Sometimes sanding will work, others will nail down a layer of thin luan plywood. Don't attempt to be a hero, if you are overmatched, call a pro and get it done in time for the holidays. That will convince her that you have excellent judgement. Good luck.
Joe
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self stick vinyl floor tiles work fine when installed in a properly prepared area - consult tile manufacturer for installation instructions
some cracks will be more visible than others when using squares and they "set"
if you don't want any cracks, use one large piece of vinyl
do you know if the existing vinyl tile has asbestos in it?
some of the stuff from the 70s era did
have it removed by someone qualified to remove asbestos tile if you're gonna remove it
some simply put new (non asbestos) tile on top of old asbestos tile rather than have to deal with properly removing it, the advisability of doing that is unknown
a hint on installation of tile squares: if it's a small area, tiles laid on the diagonal (instead of the square) make a small room look larger
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Hello:

I don't think these tiles have asbestos. They're definitely old (from the 70's) but very thin and flexible. I've seen the ones at home depot with the asbestos and those are a little bit thicker/sturdier than the flimsy (easily bendable) thin vinyl tiles that she has.
Based on what you're saying, maybe the non-stick tiles are the way to go as her floor underneath seems "bumpy" and I guess I could use an electric sander to smooth it out but I would not be sanding wood, rather it would be the dried up glue/adhesive (it's black and ridgedy and bumpy as I looked uunder one of her tiles that is coming loose. I'm not sure the easiest way to smooth out that surface.
thanks!!!

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From the 70's they are just about guaranteed to be full of asbestos. Get them tested before your friend sues you for filling her house with asbestos dust.

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Lets Play Two wrote:

The subfloor must be absolutely smooth. The smallest imperfection will migrate through any tile (except, obviously, ceramic) and mirror itself on the new surface. You MUST fill-in all depressions (even those as small as a pencil lead) and scrape off or sand down and bumps.
Ignore the advice about asbestos. It's just "stuff." No one has ever been harmed by a commercial product containing asbestos.
If you DO have asbestos - and have trouble getting rid of it - one view is to leave it in a schoolyard at night. Since the government made it so hard to deal with the material, let them take care of it.
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