Very scared and frustrated

Page 1 of 3  
We remodelled our bathroom (home built in 73) last year in june. There was linoleum flooring in the bathroom about 24 square feet that was removed as well as the ductwork that we cut a piece of that contained asbestos. We didn't know at that time and therefore no precaution was taken. After a month or so i found out that the the duct work contained asbestos and the linoleum may also have so i had some professionals come in and vacuum my house with a HEPA vacuum. I'm now so scared that the asbestos may still be in my house, on my clothes in my closets, on our beds etc. I have a two year old in the house and I'm scared to death. I feel I have jeapordized his health. I'm literally obsessed by these thoughts and can't think of anything else. My husband is totally oblivious to this. Even last year when I got the house vacuumed he thought i was over reacting to the situation. What should I do now? is my house totally contaminated? I need help!!!!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'd cover every surface with new paint, tile or whatever. I'd wash all clothes and I'd dry clean those that can't be washed. I'd buy a good hepa filter - about $400.
Then, I'd relax and enjoy what little life I may have left.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DK wrote:

Did you go to school in the 1950s? Every school had asbestos pipe insulation and some even had asbestos in the ceiling tiles. Like radon, asbestos is one of those scare words that makes otherwise sane people freak out and do foolish things.
Since we're not dying by the millions from asbestos-related lung diseases, I suspect the threat from this substance is highly exaggerated. IOW, quit worrying, be happy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I went to school in the '50s. We were given loose asbestos powder to mix with water to make modeling material for art class. I can also remember removing an old gravity hot air furnace from our house and stripping off all the asbestos paper that the pipes were wrapped in.
I am still alive, 65, with good lungs. Don't worry, if you have cleaned up, vacuumed and generally kept a clean house there is nothing to worry about. The floor covering MAY have had asbestos but it would have been sealed in the vinyl, nothing to escape. The duct may have released some, but your cleaning would have removed the dust. Don't fret about the baby, we all lived through much worse before they decided it was bad for you.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
EXT thanks for yet another reassuring reply. I didn't go to school in the 50s but i also remember using asbestos sheets over burners for chemistry experiments in the late 70s in school. I guess I worry more because of my baby and what I may have put him through but you're right so many people up until a couple of decades ago were exposed to it before they decided it was bad for us.
thanks again for the reassuring words. EXT wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What's really funny is that people run around wearing asbestos everyday and admire how beautiful it is. One form of asbestos worn frequently as jewelry is Tiger's Eye. I just love trotting that out and watching people's eyes goggle. I'm a lapidary and I do take extra precautions when cutting asbestos containing stones. Once polished and set though, they are perfectly safe. Well, they are safe in the rough form too but grinding can lead to problems.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wouldn't paint or tile. I would wash off the surfaces, or dust with a damp rag or something that would use static to hold the dust in place. I might wear an asbestos effective dust mask when doing this, and send the kid somewhere else. Then I'd open the windows, put input and output fans in them, at opposite ends of the house, and vent the house while I went shopping, or to work. It will float around, little will find anyone else because there is almost none left in the house alreadyd, and be washed into the ground by the rain.

I wonder if a toy microscope is enough to examine a filter and see if there is any asbestos on it. If not, maybe one could borrow a microcope or buy one at a pawn shop, and sell it for not much loss. But I don't think this is necessary at all. Just for the compulsive or curious.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/15/06 9:13 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

No. It has to be a decent mineralogical microscope that measures certain optical characteristics of the fiber with polarized light.
Bill -- Ferme le Bush
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The microscope used to identify asbestos is very specialized and the use of that microscope to identify asbestos requires specific training to properly identify the various types of asbestos. Even using the correct microscope and with the proper training, it isn't easy. Even the most exhaustive microscopic test (point counting) isn't particularly accurate in terms of the percent of asbestos present.
The suggestion to paint the interior of your house is good. IF there were asbestos fibers on the surfaces, painting them would encapsulate the fibers. When you're through, you'll have a nice, fresh house and, if it'll make you rest easier, it's worth it.
There are folks who can perform wipe tests to determine if there are asbestos fibers present. The place to start is in the room where you did the work. If it's not found there, it's not likely that it's anywhere else. The nice thing about this is that it's not particularly expensive.
The hype over the asbestos threat is greatly overdone, just as was the dioxin threat. Most of the folks who contract asbestosis are those who worked with asbestos under poor hygienic conditions and inhaled a lot of the fibers. Think of all of the homes that have asbestos siding (and sometimes asbestos slate roofs). There are millions of these homes around the country and asbestos fibers are shedding from them constantly. The EPA (and local state departments of natural resources) emphasize it so much because they don't want to err on the minus side, so they make you believe that one inhaled asbestos fiber dooms you. If that were truly the case, we'd all be doomed to die of asbestosis because it's not likely that anyone can go through life and not inhale even one asbestos fiber.
Harry
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For decades people didn't know a thing about asbestos and it was everywhere. Almost all are still alive. Asbestos workers, particularly ones who smoked and worked in clouds of asbestos dust, are the ones who had most of the problems. If you did not sand the floor off you probably didn't cause much of an issue. Who knows what was done in the house before you even moved in. That should give you something to really worry about. We used to play with mercury when I was a kid. Last week they closed a school and homes because kids found mercury to play with. What about the homes me and my kid friends used mercury in when we were kids. Shouldn't all homes be checked? I would thoroughly vaccuum and if still worried, call in a company that checks for asbestos contamination. But if you find it, when you go to sell, in most states you have to report it. By the way, what about the rest of your duct work. If the asbestos is flaking and in your ductwork, your air is blowing by it right now.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Art thanks for your reassuring reply. We got the duct work changed as soon as we found out and got an asbestos abatement company to do it. They even did air samples after the duct work was taken out and it was found at .002/cubic or something which was considered as equivalent to ambient air levels which i believe is normal in the air. Anyway thanks again for your reassuring reply.
Art wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
uz wrote:

If they tested a few locations in the house (not just the work area), there's your answer. You don't have an asbestos problem in your house. The test I'm thinking of involves a leaf blower and air sample collection. It stirs up any dust. If they did something radically different, maybe you can describe it?
The suggestions to paint and tile aren't helpful here. They might make sense if you were trying to cover/encapsulate materials containing asbestos, but they don't make sense since what you're worrying about is asbestos particles that may be loose in your house.
Dust removal is a good idea. Wet mopping, dusting with a damp cloth, etc, all remove dust, including any possible asbestos particles that might have settled. Vacuuming stirs up dust (especially without a HEPA filter, but even with one to some extent) and is not a good idea if you're trying to reduce an asbestos contamination problem. Since the abatement company didn't detect anything above ambient, I don't see any problem with cleaning your house however you want, including vacuuming.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Art wrote:

Nope. Not even those who replaced asbestos brake pads all day long for years. The only occupational group that was ever affected were asbestos miners.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Those are the only ones who won the big law suits. But my wife's uncle just died of asbestos lung disease.... he worked around it in a factory for 30 years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Flat assed wrong. Shipyard workers who worked on lots of Navy ships from the '30s to the '70s.
--
Jim McLaughlin

Reply address is deliberately munged.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/15/06 3:15 PM, in article pO-dnR1RVpLNQQzZnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com, "Jim McLaughlin" <jim.mclaughlin> wrote:

Is there a sentence there? -- Ferme le Bush
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

insulators who installed and replaced pipe insulation got messed up by it too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I believe that. It might be compared to the guano miners of Chile, who do or did go blind after a few years**. Yet millions of people walk by pigion doodoo on the sidewalk all the time without going blind.
**Yet took/take the jobs anyhow, knowing they would probably? go blind, because they needed the money.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/15/06 9:15 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

Okay, you hooked me. Why did they go blind? Do you have any reference for that?
Bill -- Ferme le Bush
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Because of stuff in the guano. I don't know what stuff.

My brother. He's 7 years older than I and never wrong. :)
He told me this 30 or 40 years ago. It's almost 5AM. If I can, tomorrow I'll look for a second source.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.