Using the Sewer Vent for Cable or Cat5e Run?

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I'm trying to figure out the best path, other than drilling and the time consuming process of fishing/drilling through floors, to get a RG6 cable and Cat5e cable from my attic to my basement.
I have heard that you can run plenium Cat5 down environmental vents without any issues. The sewer vent runs from the attic to the basement and is the only direct path I can see. The pipe is 2" and is used for my sump pump in the basement. I was going to cut the pipe and use a 45 degree capped splitter for the wires in the basement to avoid drilling ugly holes directly in the pipe.
Is this NOT a good idea? Any restrictions on if I can do this with RG6 or Cat5E?
I'm in Georgia, if that helps any in regards to code.
Thanks!
Tony
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One thing to try first, (I can't answer your question directly as I don't know) -- Some of my plumbing pipes have enough room around them to trop a line down the outside of them, between the pipe and the floors they penetrate. We used a chain tied to the end of fishin line as a weight to drop straight down through the holes. It took a few shots, but we got it.
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if you have a pipe in straight line from bottom to top of the building,then you don't have to drill anything...
your pipe is round,and much of the time the guys make a square hole to let pass from floor to floor,with a bit of patient and a good fish (1/4 inch) you can pass from top to bottom then pull the wire up,wait till its a bit less hot in the attic to try it..

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DONT run any cables inside sewer lines, the wiring entry exit spots can leak and explosive gasses get in your home. from say a natural gas leak on the street or if a idiot dumps gasoline down a sewer.........
run wires along side sewer or other lines, in a closet, behind kitchen cabinets, up a fake downspout outside home, had a friend who ran conduit right along a downspout, it was invisible.
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If a 1/4" hole filled with wire and silicone in a vent pipe is going to allow explosive gasses into your home or gasoline fumes from the guy down the block who is always putting a gallon or two of gas down his sewer...the problem won't be at the little hole.
Now if you are always worried about the natural gas leak on the street causing gas to go in the roof vent, down into the house and into the little hole filled with silicone.... I would never open my windows... LOL

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gary wrote:

They don't worry about guy down the street with gasoline. The methane and other toxic gases formed naturally are plenty enough to cause problems. Poof.
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gary wrote:

People go to lots of work to avoid doing it right and can cause troubles at home resale time
Do it right do it once then sit back and relax!
Sewer gas accidently entering your home can lead to all sorts of troubles including illness and hazardous gasses that can cause explosions.
those pesky rules were largely written after bad problems occured
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you heard a bad idea.
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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On Fri, 08 Sep 2006 04:53:21 -0700, tljones wrote:

One time I had a sewer line clog which required running a Roto-Rooter down the vent pipe on the roof to clear. The plumber told me it was not that unusual to have to resort to this entry point.
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Tony, you said the vent is used for your sump pump. Are you certain that's its only use? Here in Colorado sump pumps are required to discharge to daylight and may not be connected to the sewer. Is yours connected to the sewer, or does it discharge to daylight?

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I think it comes from his sump pit. In some area it is only used as a vent for radon not for actual water discharge. The water line will go out of the side of the house.

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Why not go wireless?
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On 13 Sep 2006 12:57:28 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Wireless hardware is more complex, and so less reliable. It is harder to set up computers and other devices. Range is limited (and reception can be intermittent and subject to interference), but still is likely to provide physical access when it's not wanted (security vulnerabilities) so requires directional setup (WPA and such), which increases setup time and decreases available bandwidth.
--
103 days until the winter solstice celebration

Mark Lloyd
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

Just piggybacking on the last posted message: The OP hasn't responded to any of these messages, so he apparently doesn't care. My suggestion for anyone who does care, is that vinyl siding is a great conduit for cable of any kind. I have run cat5 through vinyl siding. Just drill two holes in the sheetrock and sheathing, one at the source of the cable and the other at the destination, run the cable under the siding after unzipping the siding panel, down or up at the corner channels if necessary, and into the destination room. Use boxes with connectors for the source and destination holes for a neater connection.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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What does code say about this? You're talking about running wires essentially externally. That and I'd worry about the long term issues with something else going through the siding at a later date. Why introduce a headache for the next homeowner when they discover someone put wires improperly underneath the siding? That and fire code issues with the jacket material catching fire and acting as a fuse taking the fire to other areas it might not otherwise.
No, don't half-ass it with something like this. It's your HOME, the largest investment you're likely to make in your life. Don't short-change it by doing something like this.
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On Fri, 15 Sep 2006 08:05:58 -0400, "Bill Kearney"

You're allowed to run coax and cat-5 right up the side of the house OUTSIDE the siding if you want to, it's just ugly as hell. The only thing I'd add is, seal the penetrations with caulk or foam to limit wind and insect penetration.
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Bill Kearney wrote:

While I agree with Mr. Kearney that it's better to "do it right" in the first place, I seriously doubt a length of wire would pose any more hazard in a fire if it was located on the outside of the siding or underneath it. I've never heard of a cable acting as a "fuse". There are far more combustible materials used in home construction and I doubt the "fuse factor" would be pose any real issue. I mean, by the time it gets hot enough to ignite FT-4 or FT-6 rated jacket, the vinyl siding would be ablaze as well.
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Suit yourself, quite possibly 'law-suit'.
Code exists for a reason. It's all a bunch of little stuff, but much like the death of a thousand pinpricks, it's the little stuff that adds up. Just because your one wire isn't a problem doesn't mean it won't become part of a larger problem later. I've seen and heard tell of all sorts of wiring stupidities, some DIY, a fair bit by "professionals". I'd rather avoid doing something lazy on the premise it "might not" be a real problem.
Really, your home is probably the most expensive investment you'll ever make in your life, why screw around with it? Why put your life and your money at risk? Just to be cheap/lazy? Honestly, it makes no rational sense.
But hey, feel free, someone's gotta keep the firemen, lawyers and morgue clerks busy...
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Bill Kearney wrote:

OK. Glad you got that off you chest. I still have serious doubts that a "hunk" of wire could become a fuse though.
Now before you go off on another "tangent", I too, have seen the "results" of DIY "inspiration" when it comes to running wire. If you honestly don't know what you're doing in the first place, listening to some "nimrod" on the phone for two hours explaining the "how to's" probably won't help either. What might take you three hours (and a whole lot of frustration) to do would take a seasoned installer (with all the right tools) about fifteen minutes. I think your house (and your piece of mind) is definitely worth the two hours the guy might charge for a "complex" run.
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Exactly.
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