Upgrading insulation with Blown-in cellulose or fiberglass

The 2nd floor of my 50-year old Cape varies wildly in temperature from the 1st floor during the winter and summer months. I was investigating ways to minimze heat loss though the attic and exterior walls/sloped ceilings of finshed rooms on the 2nd floor.
Are far as I can tell, there is minimal insulation in the 2 side attics which I have access to. Any that is there is about one inch thick and is prob the original insulation. There is some additional space behind the kneewalls of the 2nd floor. I don't have access behind the walls but expect that there is little or no insulation. This area is maybe 3 feet deep and runs almost the enire length of the 2nd floor.
For the areas I can access, fiberglass batts seem easy enough but the blown fiberglass contrarctor I spoke with was against using blown for any cavities that we could not access such as behind the knee walls, exterior walls and sloped ceiling. He was concerned with blockages that could not be seen and any old insulation that might become a blockage. Now I thought the whole point of blown-in was so you could retrofit old houses and not worry about tearing down drywall/plaster.
Is cellulose a better solution in dealing with blockages?
Also would this upgrade in insulation solve my sweltering upsairs/cool downstairs problem in the summer?
Any information would be greatly appreciated.
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This is Turtle.
To try to detail all the points of what insulation you should have in different area is very hard to do. Now I will say this : If you insulate a house well enough you can heat it with a candle and cool it with a ice cube. This is over doing the words a little but the ideal is there.
I don't like Cellulose as a insulation for dust in your house for years to come.
TURTLE
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