Update on the treehouse bridge in the redwoods of the Santa Cruz mountains

Page 3 of 3  
Phil Hobbs wrote, on Mon, 16 Feb 2015 17:45:37 -0500:

Actually, if you saw the first pictures, the cables don't actually "touch" any tree (this is the smallest pine at the low end):
https://c3.staticflickr.com/3/2944/15188634078_2b3de04150.jpg
What we did was attach two-by fours to the tree, and then wrap the cables around the two by fours.
https://c4.staticflickr.com/4/3870/15188634228_37f45d19e2_c.jpg
Dunno if that will "protect" the tree or not; but that's why we did it that way (in theory).
You'll notice we doubled the cable at *both* ends also, so that there are always *two* cables at all points, even around the big tree where there is no cable joint at all.
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wrote:

Actually a bolt through the tree is the least damaging way to attach something. The comparison with woodpeckers nests is not valid - they make large holes that greatly interfere with sap flow. Methods wrapping around a trunk can do enormous damage as the tree grows, including effectively ring-barking (hence killing) the tree.
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wrote:

Shouldn't there be a forestry or similar department you could ask for advice?
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On 2/16/2015 9:21 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Is the cable(s) around the tree adjustable for growth ? Or will the blocks start to dig in.
Martin
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Martin Eastburn wrote, on Tue, 17 Feb 2015 16:03:06 -0600:

Not adjustable, at least not in the sense that we built that into the design.
So, eventually, the blocks will dig into the tree.
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Oren wrote, on Mon, 16 Feb 2015 11:19:58 -0800:

Oren, ever since kooties and large feet, I've learned that when you say the huckleberries are ripe, the huckleberries are ripe.
I should have taken a picture of it, but, the dog stays mostly on the other side of the fence, not even close to the bridge anymore.
Certainly he doesn't venture out on the bridge. Some day, I'll snap a picture if he does though.
For you, my friend.
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Oren wrote, on Mon, 16 Feb 2015 12:54:30 -0800:

:)
Interestingly, that dog is fantastically protective!
When the mountain lion came by, and we didn't know it, he was barking and yelping like crazy and growling, which is not his normal nature. It was only later, when one of the animals got killed, during the storm, where the dog was locked inside, that we had realized what he was making all that commotion about.
So, now, the dog stays outside, with the rest of the animals, to protect them, even during the storms (which may have abated until next winter, by now).
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Oren wrote, on Mon, 16 Feb 2015 13:33:25 -0800:

There's a funny thing about mountain lions.
They can easily bring down a full-sized buck, so, a puny human "should" be easy prey. Given that they're experienced hunters, I doubt the human would have much time to see the mountain lion that gets him.
Given that, the mountain lion should "win" against a puny human, particularly with the claws and teeth of the mountain lion wrapped around a puny human's head, neck, and throat.
So, given that, why aren't there far more mountain lion attacks than statistics show?
Clearly, where I hike alone (almost daily), mountain lions abound. We have dead deer, dead goats and sheep, and even videos of a mountain lion dragging a buck taken by a dash cam on our winding road.
The enigma is that there aren't really a whole lot of documented attacks on humans. Sure, humans aren't their standard fare; but how do "they" know that?
I'm not worried, but, I do hike in these here hills almost every day, and, I haven't yet "seen" a mountain lion (although I've seen plenty of dead deer).
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The reason is that humans ganged up on and killed critters that dared to take a human. Over the last say 50,000 years, this enduring bit of Darwinist pressure had a big effect. Five or six people with spears are quite capable of killing a lion.
Joe Gwinn
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I've encountered mountain lions (aka cougar, puma) in both the Santa Teresa foothills and the Marin headlands. They're sized similar to a medium sized dog (24" to 36" at the shoulders, 65 to 180 pounds depending on gender and age).
The lions mainly hunt from dusk to dawn, which is one reason that human-lion encounters are rare. The lions are also not interested in humans as prey.
http://mountainlion.org/FAQfrequentlyaskedquestions.asp
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On Fri, 20 Feb 2015 20:01:51 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

I encountered one in my back yard. Awakened by the dog barking very strangely, I stuck my head out the arcadia door to encounter mountain lion with my dog standing on top of his dog house shaking like crazy ;-)
Mountain lion took off like a bullet.          ...Jim Thompson
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On Friday, February 20, 2015 at 1:01:55 PM UTC-7, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Cougars have attacked bicycle riders, people on horseback AND people just walking in the woods. They are NOT harmless pussycats. Google for more up-to-date data on these animals. =================
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Run your perspective design by a college arborist and mechanical engineering department, to assure safety, for both you and the tree.
are redwoods a protected species where you live?
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bob haller wrote, on Fri, 20 Feb 2015 05:26:09 -0800:

In California, it is my understanding that EVERY tree is protected if it's large enough to measure 1 foot wide at about chest height.
If you cut down a tree, you have to get a permit; even if it were dead or dying.
The permit, I'm told, is free, but, generally you have to plant an equal number of trees to replace the ones you cut down.
If you remove trees without a permit, they can fine you, or let you go (up to them).
That's what I remember about a conversation about an oak tree in my yard that was blocking the view anyway.
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I helped my neighbor with the 75-foot by 16-foot wide (at the tree) bridge today, so I figured I'd show you some shots from below:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8652/16450875917_af82eebc34_c.jpg
Notice in that picture above that there is a "widowmaker" of about ten feet long hanging in mid air, ready to fall. Also notice that the "sucker" was cut flush, and the boards screwed to it ...just because we could.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8567/16657149282_ea45534049_c.jpg
We're close enough to the big redwood to touch it now!
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8592/16658170035_a640960476_c.jpg
Here's a view, looking down, at the big tree, inches away from it:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8660/16470768820_6acd2799dd_c.jpg
That's a milestone after so much work starting at the other end.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8633/16450876947_275ed77b68_c.jpg
I tried to get a picture to take the whole thing, from under:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8626/16450875757_e3f7fe0fba_c.jpg
But, the best I can show you in a single pic is a side view:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8584/16656782871_c9052bebfa_c.jpg
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