unvented wall mounted gas space heater

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[original post is likely clipped to save bandwidth] On Wed, 11 Jan 2006 10:07:42 -0500, Cooltemp Industries

The current unvented heaters with O2 depletion sensing pilots have over a 40 year track record of safety in Europe. CO has not proven to be an issue with real data.
Nuisance outages is real issue particularly at higher altitudes where O2 is depleted!
Most states require they only be used for supplemental heat or decorative use.
MA was one of the last states in the US to approve unvented gas heaters. Unlike 48 states, MA added the requirement of not only an O2 depletion sensor but a hard wired battery back up CO detector in each room such a heater is installed, (the hard wire requirement is new).
Now if someone could provide credible references of a properly installed and inspected O2 depletion sensing heater causing hazardous CO, please post it!
Air quality is a different topic and may depend upon what sensitivities an individual has. Some states such as ME (Maine) require ERV in every new home or with any new heating system. That does a lot for air quality.
RE CO, I'd personally worry more about a faulty furnace's combustion products than a properly installed unvented heater.
gerry
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How about Rinnai? http://www.rinnai.us/products/heatersfurnaces/products.asp
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wrote:

I misread this question earlier, so I'm a little late in answering it-- http://www.dixieproducts.com/vent-free_stoves.html and http://www.comfort-glow-comfortglow.com /
Mine's a Desa. I thought it was cool that they made it from cast iron and it is as heavy as a woodstove-- and it probably does add to the illusion-- but man is it a bear to move. [I don't do it often, but I found the best way to get rid of the dust is to take it outside and blow the dust with compressed air.]
Jim
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