Unsticking a frozen back brake cable

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...on a bicycle that hasn't been used in a while. It doesn't look rusty, but that's probably what it is.
Liquid Wrench, or WD-40?
Bob
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cable may be frayed, i would just replace the cable. better safe than sorry
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zxcvbob wrote the following:

New brake cable.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

Thirded, they're only a few bucks. If you bring in the old housings, the bike shop can cut you some new ones the same length for an extra couple of dollars.
Jon
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willshak wrote:

Does not cost much either.
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What we used to use back in the motorcycle days is soak in acetone, and try to work it loose. Most times, though, it needed replaced. What is great is to take the whole cable out of the housing, but then you have to cut it, making a clean cut, and then to reinsert it all the way through, you have to solder the end to make it smooth enough to pass through the housing without catching. A lot of times, unless it was a specialty rare cable, or expensive, it was just easier to replace the whole thing.
HTH
Steve
visit my blog at http://cabgbypasssurgery.com watch for the book
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On Thu, 15 Jul 2010 21:35:29 -0700, Smitty Two

Sounds good to me.
Once you get the cable oving in the sheath a little bit, it will work completely loose very quickly.
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wrote:

PB-Blaster works a lot better than either of those. But IMHO you're better off just replacing the cable -- it's only a few bucks.
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PB Blaster-
But replacement is the smart move.
Jim
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The one time I did this, used liquid wrench. Position the bike so that one end of the cable sticks straight up. Expect to be there for a while, with the little dripper can. But, the cable did free up.
I've also got a balky cable for my Blazer. For that, I used a 1 cc syringe, with 25 ga x 5/8 needle. Pull the plunger out, and filled the syringe with silicone spray. Inject under the boot, at the end of the cable. Pump the parking brake pedal and release, five times every time I get in the truck. When I can remember. Seems to be helping.
--
Christopher A. Young
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zxcvbob wrote:

WD-40, it will leave behind some lubrication to prevent future freeze ups.
--
LSMFT

I haven't spoken to my wife in 18 months.
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over time wd 40 residue turns to sticky goo...........
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On Fri, 16 Jul 2010 06:23:41 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

How long a time? I'm still waiting for the 150 yr old clock that I 'cleaned' with WD40 in 1983 & only wind up every couple of years to stop keeping good time.
From what I can see- no goo & no dust.
Jim
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On 7/16/2010 8:35 AM, LSMFT wrote:

Unless they have recently changed the formulation the light aromatics will evaporate leaving sticky stuff behind. WD40 isn't a lubricant.
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wrote:

Try a little experiment: spray some WD-40 onto a piece of clean glass and let it sit in the sun until it evaporates. Then tell report back what remains.
HINT: it won't be sticky.
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Then, wait six more months, and tell us what you find.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Sat, 17 Jul 2010 08:09:43 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
Even more nothing remains.
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snipped-for-privacy@nowheremonfrere.com wrote:

That's dark matter. When enough aggregates, a black hole forms. You have been warned.
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Nonsense. There isn't any "sticky stuff" in WD-40, and it is a lubricant. Not a very good one, I'll grant you, but it is a lubricant. The MSDS
http://www.wd40company.com/files/pdf/msds-wd494716385.pdf
shows that it's somewhere between 17 and 25 percent oil.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in wrote:

my experience is that WD-40 gums up. it's also a poor penetrant.
--
Jim Yanik
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