Underground Sprinkler System Cut-Off Valve


The main shut-off valve to my underground sprinkler system is in my crawl space.
I would like to hire someone to extend the shut-off valve underneath the foundation of my house, to the outside.
I know it would have to be buried down deep, below the frost line.
Has anyone done this? Is it a huge headache to do this?
Many thanks, and if you have any tips, please pass those on too.
Kate
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Where do you live, in what Temp Zone, im in zone 5 and freeze depth is near 2.5-3 feet, you have to go with record lows or some year it will ruin the valve. There is probably good reason its where it is, mine is in the heated basement.
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On 4/16/2010 4:03 AM, ransley wrote:

I am in central Washington state. My three other homes in this city had the turn off outside, buried deep in a box.
Sorry, but I don't know what zone I am in.
Thanks.
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"Kate" wrote in message

How about leaving the valve in the basement and just adding a valve outside? Then in summer, leave inside valve on and use outside valve. Winter leave outside valve on, turn inside valve off.
Another option is to install an electric valve after the manual valve in the basement. Then run wires to a switch upstairs. Or install a timer so it goes on automatically.
All sorts of options!
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On 4/16/2010 4:28 AM, Bill wrote:

Unless I am missing something here, I would still have to crawl underneath the house. I am trying to get away from that.
Thanks.
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Kate wrote:

Is the valve in such a place that you could fudge on an extension to the valve handle so you could turn it on from outside? If the valve is a ball valve, this could be as simple as a stool rod with a bent end going through a hole near the end of the handle, which you would push or pull to operate the valve.
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What I have done with regular water line coming in is to run a shut off valve in series with the incoming line in a closet so I can shut off when I need to repair or change any plumbing with out going under house. You could use this method also for your sprinkler line. WW

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I agree, you'd be way better off exptendingthe shut off valve up to a closet wall somewhere. Or over so it is right by your crawl door. What's the problem with it now, you have to go way under the hosue to get to it? Mines in the crawl but I put it right by the crawl door.
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On 4/16/2010 9:21 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

Now that is a great idea too.
Yes, the problem is that I have to crawl the entire length of my house to get to it. It is the black widows that concern me, plus it is a bear crawling that far. I always take my cell phone with me in case something happens.
Thanks.
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Wonder if you can cut a hatch through the floor. Lay on the floor, and reach down to the valve?
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Christopher A. Young
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On 4/16/2010 8:09 PM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

That would be great, but this is right underneath my kitchen. I wish I could run it up into my pantry, but it won't work.
Thanks.
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On 4/16/2010 8:10 AM, WW wrote:

My Dad did this and it worked great.
My problem is that this valve is underneath my kitchen, and there is not one closet in sight, but maybe I could run it to the pantry, but that is quite a distance. You did give me something more to think about though. A plumber sure could tell me if this would be easy enough to do.
Many thanks.
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Every municipality uses exterior water shut off valves buried below local frost levels. Call your water department and ask what company makes them, and then contact a good plumbing outfit to install a version that suits your needs. Some can be buried in deep covered boxes, some actually have ground level means of turning off and on. The result should be pretty much a durable and trouble free system IMO.
Joe
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On 4/16/2010 11:17 AM, Joe wrote:

Thanks for this idea Joe. Most of the valves in my city are outside, buried deep in a box. I feel safe with it in the crawl space as it won't freeze, but it is a hassle crawling to turn it on/off every spring/fall.
Our temps generallly get down to zero during the winter.
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Zero might be zone 7 and its a deep box, google US Zone map or USDA plant hardiness map, if you have Perrennial plants, you need to know your Zone.
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Kate wrote:

I don't suppose you could just install a long (a few feet long) valve stem that puts the handle outside? That would be easy!
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Maybe screw the valve handle to a length of two by two lumber, that could be turned. While reaching in through an access hatch though the floor?
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